Feature Stories Campus Events

What's Up in Lexington/Rockbridge, It's Barrister's Ball

Here’s the next installment of our roundup of events in the Lexington and Rockbridge area, compiled by 3L Hannah Shtein. Feb Club comes to a close with “Law Prom.”

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Lexington Restaurant Week (through the 28th). DAILY, 8:00am-11:00pm, Downtown Lexington & Surrounding Area. Dozens of restaurants and food-related retail shops in Lexington will be participating in our Winter Restaurant Week. The theme this year is “Knock the Chill Off!”, with dining and shopping offerings focusing on all things warm, cozy, and delicious. Pick up a postcard listing all the specials and discounts — and enter to win one of over two dozen gift certificates in our Restaurant Week Sweepstakes! Come out of your winter hibernation and join us for a week-long celebration of food.

Feb ClubAround the World: Join the residents of the Hess and Co. apartments for a global adventure. There will be a different country represented in each home.

Friday, February 27, 2015

Live @ the Lab – 6:00pm, Blue Lab Brewing Company, 123 S. Randolph St., (540) 458-0146, Enjoy a pint while listening to acoustic rock and roll. Live @ The Lab with Alex Shreve!

Feb Club – Jarty: All. Jean. Everything. Hosted by Rai, Tina, and Laura (Feb Club Hall of Famers). Denim.

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Feb Club – BARRISTER’S BALL!! 8-11:30pm in Evans Hall. This is the party we’ve all been waiting for. Bring out those evening gowns, tuxedos, and suits for the most formal party of the year. Barrister’s Ball aka “Law Prom” is sure to be a blast this year. Open bar all night. Heavy hors d’oeuvres. Music by In Full, the same band that killed it at Over the Hump. All law students are invited regardless of Feb Club status–so be there! There will, however, be an official Feb Club late night at Laura, Tina, and Rai’s house!

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Artist’s Talk & Reception: Louis Markoya – Strange Attractors – 5:30pm, Concert Hall, Wilson Hall, Washington & Lee University. Louis Markoya, former protege of legendary Surrealist artist Salvador Dali (1904-1989), invites viewers to enhance their neural networks with works the he describes as “a look into the fractal nature of life and mind.” Using technological advances in 3D printing and animation as well as traditional media such as painting and sculpture, Markoya explores a contemporary expression of Surrealism. The exhibit will also feature original works by Dali from Markoya’s own collection, which are being exhibited for the first time.

Weekly Growler Grab Day at the Devils Backbone Outpost (MAR) – Every Wednesday, Devils Backbone Brewing Company, Outpost Tap Room, 50 Northwind Lane, Lexington, (540) 462-6200. Visit the Tap Room and fill up your 64 oz. growler for $5 on Wednesdays. Each week you can fill up your growler with an Outpost brewed beer at this special price!

Weekly Lexington Indoor Farmers Market – 9am-1pm, 18 East Nelson Street. Every Wednesday the market will bring you locally produced vegetables, eggs, baked goods, fruit, cheese, honey, chestnuts, and more. For information contact Mitch Wapner at 463-9234.

Related //

Executive-in-Residence Leland Miller '98 to Give Talk on China's Economy on March 10

Leland Miller ’98, CEO of China Beige Book International, will give a talk, “Demystifying China’s Economy in 2015,” at 7:30 p.m. on Mar. 10 in Stackhouse Theater. This event is free and open to the public, and will be streamed live online.

Investors and policymakers obsess over the growth of China’s economy, but what is actually happening across regions and sectors remains a mystery to those who rely solely on China’s official government data.

Combining the largest private data operation ever to operate in a closed economy with unrivaled connections to sources on the ground, Miller will explain the evolving Chinese marketplace and provide unique insight into China’s true growth, credit and labor dynamics—as well as what Beijing’s leadership has in store in terms of restructuring and reform in 2015.

Tired of unreliable data provided solely by the Chinese government, Miller founded the China Beige Book in 2012. Adapted from methodology used by the U.S. Federal Reserve’s “Beige Book,” China Beige Book relies on its own independent data, collected quarterly, which includes survey data from over 2,000 Chinese firms and in-depth interviews across each of its regions and sectors.

Miller was a history and Chinese major at W&L. He also holds a law degree from the University of Virginia and a master’s degree in Chinese history from Oxford University. A leading expert on China’s financial system, he is a frequent guest on media outlets such as CNBC and CNBC Asia, Bloomberg TV and Radio, BBC, Al-Jazeera and China’s CCTV, among others. His work is featured regularly in such publications as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Bloomberg, TIME, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Forbes, Foreign Policy and The Washington Post.

W&L’s Deborah Miranda to Lecture on the Constant State of Transition: Mapping the Borderlands between Scholarship and Poetry

Deborah A. Miranda, professor of English at Washington and Lee University, will give her inaugural lecture marking her appointment as the John Lucian Smith Jr. Memorial Term Professor on Monday, March 2, at 8 p.m. in Northen Auditorium in Leyburn Library.

The title of her lecture is “In a Constant State of Transition: Mapping the Borderlands Between Scholarship and Poetry.” It is free and open to the public, and will be streamed live online.

“I am a mestiza,” said Miranda. “Half Indian, half white. Half poet, half academic. Split between the East and West Coasts of the North American continent, I have spent most of my life negotiating the complexity of in-betweenness, a place where the work of my scholarship often clashes with the work of my heart’s passion. Research demands facts, precision, efficiency, respect for deadlines, while poetry demands a suspension of time, ambiguity, messiness, irreverence for rules.

“Is it possible to create a true mestiza work out of these two beloved but very separate cultures, to conceive and give birth to a mixed, hybrid, generative and balanced creativity? What would this kind of research look like? What would this kind of poetry look like? Is it possible to create this new kind of space in the in-between, and how would one keep one’s balance on constantly shifting ground? This talk is a map of surviving that encounter, that clash and all its glorious consequences—in a body, a life and a career.”

Miranda earned her B.S. in teaching moderate special needs children from Wheelock College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington. Before joining the W&L faculty in 2004, she taught at Pacific Lutheran University.

Her books include “Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir” (2013); “The Zen of La Llorona: Poems” (2005); and “Indian Cartography: Poems” (1999). She co-edited “Sovereign Erotics: An Anthology of Two-Spirit Writing” (2011). Forthcoming is “Raised by Humans” (2015) and under contract is “The Hidden Stories of Isabel Meadows and other Lacunae of California Indian History.”

Her poetry has been published in over 100 journals, and she has over 20 published articles.

Miranda has appeared in various media such as television, radio and stage. She has had more than 25 publications in anthologies and literary journals including “Obsession: Sestinas in the 21st-Century;” “Women Write Resistance;” “En esa redonda nacion de sangre.” She also is the author of six academic articles.

She has won the Gold Medalist from Independent Publishers Association (“Bad Indians”); Pathfinder Award from Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers (“Sovereign Erotics”) and a Virginia Center for the Creative Arts Fellowship, among others.

The John Lucian Smith Jr. Memorial Term Professorship was established in 2010 through the generous support of friends of Smith. It is a permanently endowed fund at Washington and Lee University providing support for a faculty member in the English Department or the School of Law who is judged to be excellent in teaching and in professional contributions. The award recognizes a different professor every three to five years.

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Deborah E. Lipstadt, Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University, to Lecture at W&L

Deborah E. Lipstadt, Dorot Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University, will give a public lecture at Washington and Lee University on March 4 at 4:30 p.m. in the Stackhouse Theater of Elrod Commons.

The title of Lipstadt’s lecture, which is free and open to the public, is “History on Trial: My Day in Court with David Irving.”

Lipstadt’s most recent book is “The Eichmann Trial” (2011). Her earlier book, “History on Trial: My Day in Court with a Holocaust Denier” (2005) is the story of her libel trial in London against David Irving who sued her for calling him a Holocaust denier and right-wing extremist. The judge found Irving to be a Holocaust denier, a falsifier of history, a racist and an anti-Semite.

She is also the author of “Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory” (1993), which is the first full-length study of those who attempt to deny the Holocaust; and “Beyond Belief: The American Press and the Coming of the Holocaust” (1986), which is an examination of how the American press covered the news of the persecution of European Jews between the years 1933 and 1945.

Lipstadt was an historical consultant to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and helped design the section of the museum dedicated to the American response to the Holocaust. She was appointed by President Bill Clinton to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council on which she served two terms. She was a member of its executive committee and chaired the Educational Committee and Academic Committee of the Holocaust Museum.

She has been called upon by members of Congress to consult on political responses to Holocaust denial. From 1996 through 1999, she served as a member of the State Department Advisory Committee on Religious Freedom Abroad. In this capacity she, together with a small group of leaders and scholars, advised Secretary of State Madeline Albright on matters of religious persecution abroad.

Lipstadt has appeared on CNN, “60 Minutes,” “Today Show,” “Good Morning America,” NPR’s “Fresh Air,” the BBC and is a frequent contributor to and is widely quoted in a variety of newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post and the New York Times.

At Emory she created the Institute for Jewish Studies and was its first director from 1998-2008. She has received numerous teaching awards, including Emory’s student government association’s award for being the teacher most likely to motivate students to learn about new and unfamiliar topics and the Emory Williams award, for her courses on modern Jewish and Holocaust studies.

Lipstadt received her B.A. from City College of New York and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Brandeis University. She has taught at UCLA and Occidental College in Los Angeles.

Brant Hellwig Named Next Dean of W&L Law

Washington and Lee University President Kenneth P. Ruscio has announced the appointment of Brant Hellwig, professor of law at Washington and Lee University and an expert in the field of federal taxation, as dean of the W&L School of Law, effective July 1, 2015.

Hellwig succeeds Nora V. Demleitner, who announced earlier this week she would step down as dean at the end of the academic year.

Hellwig joined the W&L law school faculty in 2012. He teaches a variety of tax courses, including Federal Income Taxation of Individuals, Partnership Taxation, Corporate Taxation, and Estate and Gift Taxation. His scholarship in the field is similarly broad, ranging from the income tax treatment of deferred compensation arrangements to the estate tax treatment of closely held business entities employed as trust substitutes.

At W&L Law, Hellwig has served on a number of critical committees, including two years as chair of the Faculty Appointments Committee. He also was a member of the Board of Trustees task force working group that developed the recently announced strategic transition plan, which positions the law school to maintain its distinctive mission while adapting to the changing environment of both legal education and the legal profession.

“I am delighted that Professor Hellwig has agreed to accept this appointment and have the utmost confidence in his ability to lead the law school during this critical time,” said Ruscio. “I look forward to working with Professor Hellwig and the entire law school community to ensure that the School of Law remains a defining feature of Washington and Lee.”

Provost Daniel A. Wubah noted that Hellwig’s appointment ensures a seamless transition over the coming weeks.

“Professor Hellwig has a clear understanding of our law school’s mission, character and goals,” said Wubah. “Both he and Dean Demleitner will have the full support of the faculty and administration during the transition.”

Hellwig received his B.S. summa cum laude and J.D. magna cum laude from Wake Forest University. After practicing with the firm of Bell, Davis & Pitt, P.A. in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, he pursued his LL.M. in taxation at New York University School of Law, where he received the Harry J. Rudick Memorial Award for distinction in the tax program.

After serving as law clerk to the Hon. Juan F. Vasquez of the U.S. Tax Court, Hellwig began his academic career at NYU as an acting assistant professor. He then accepted a permanent appointment to the University of South Carolina School of Law, where he was a member of the faculty for 10 years. During his tenure at South Carolina and W&L, Hellwig has received a number of institutional awards recognizing both his teaching and his scholarship.

“W&L School of Law is a truly remarkable place. We have a small, collegial student body that regularly interacts with a faculty comprised of engaged scholars and committed teachers,” said Hellwig. “The place has a feel that is both comforting and invigorating. It is a joy to be a part of this intellectual community, and it will be a privilege to lead the school.

“I look forward to working with Dean Demleitner in the months ahead so that the school may continue to build on her many accomplishments.”

In addition to numerous law review articles, Hellwig has published a casebook on Federal Estate and Gift Taxation with W&L law professor Robert Danforth and recently completed a manuscript commissioned by the U.S. Tax Court. “The United States Tax Court: An Historical Analysis” is an expanded revision of the seminal text published in 1979 by Harold Dubroff on the Tax Court’s evolution as a judicial body and its statutory jurisdiction.

In announcing the appointment, Ruscio also paid tribute to Demleitner for her efforts on behalf of the school during her three-year tenure as dean.

“I would like to express on behalf of the entire Washington and Lee community our deepest appreciation to Dean Demleitner for her contributions these last three years,” said Ruscio.

Among her accomplishments, Demleitner worked to improve the school’s bar passage rates and placement rates, revamped the Career Services Office, led renovations of Lewis Hall and nearly completed the law school capital campaign target of $35 million. She increased diversity in the law school faculty and student body and enhanced the school’s innovative third-year curriculum by adding the Washington D.C. semester. Following her sabbatical leave, Demleitner intends to bring her expertise as a criminal law scholar to the W&L Law faculty.

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W&L Team Wins Inaugural Global Antitrust Invitational Moot Court Competition

A team of third-year law students from Washington and Lee University participated in the inaugural Global Antitrust Invitational Moot Court Competition, held Feb. 20-21 at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington.

David Johnson, Kyle Virtue, and Matthew Hale were awarded first place in the competition. The team also won the award for best brief.

Eight teams in all participated in the invitation-only competition, including teams from the University of Michigan Law School, Notre Dame Law School, George Washington University Law School, and the University of Florida Levin College of Law.

The problem for the competition involved a dispute between two cellular phone service providers. Johnson, Virtue and Hale wrote a brief on behalf of appellant Dominion Telecommunications, Inc. arguing that the company did not violate Section 2 of the Sherman Act. The district court found that Dominion had illegally monopolized the cellular services market by using its dominant size to force an upstart cellular company out of the market. The smaller upstart cried foul, but the ultimate question was whether consumers were actually harmed by the loss of one, small company from the market.

During the competition, the team went through five rounds of arguments before four different panels of judges. The final round was judged by the two top antitrust enforcement officials in the U.S. – the Asst. Attorney General in charge of the DOJ Antitrust Division, William Baer, and the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, Edith Ramirez – as well as a highly respected federal court of appeals judge and antitrust expert, Douglas Ginsburg.

The Global Antitrust Institute Invitational is the only moot court competition devoted exclusively to antitrust law. Competing teams have the chance to not only compete in a federal circuit court, but also attend a private reception and network with an extensive list of litigation and antitrust professionals from the Washington, D.C. area.

W&L Law professors Jeff Miles ’73L and David Eggert, both of whom have extensive antitrust practice experience, helped prepare the team for this first ever competition.

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Washington and Lee Politics Professor to Speak at Lincoln Memorial on March 7

Lucas Morel, the Class of 1960 Professor of Ethics and Politics at Washington and Lee University, will make remarks at the Lincoln Memorial as part of the sesquicentennial of President Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Speech. He will be joined by Meet the Press’ Chuck Todd and Howard University history professor Edna Green Medford. The event takes place on Saturday, March 7, at 9:30 a.m., and is free and open to the public.

Author of the recently released Lincoln and Liberty: Wisdom for the Ages, Morel is the university’s preeminent Lincoln scholar. He is a board member of the Abraham Lincoln Association and a past president of the Abraham Lincoln Institute.

What's Up in Lexington/Rockbridge, Mardi Gras?

Here’s the next installment of our roundup of events in the Lexington and Rockbridge area, compiled by 3L Hannah Shtein. It maybe below zero outside, but Mardi Gras-Lexington Edition-is on! And it’s restaurant week!

Friday, February 20, 2015

Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park”, a new musical. Southern Virginia University (through Saturday, February 21). 7:30pm, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Southern Virginia University, Chandler Hall, Buena Vista (540) 261-8464 $10adults, $7 seniors and children 12 and under, $32 family rate. A new musical based on Jane Austen’s novel. Impoverished Fanny Price is raised by her wealthy relations at Mansfield Park. When sophisticated siblings Mary and Henry Crawford move into the neighborhood, Fanny finds the normally predictable Mansfield Park turned upside-down with messy love affairs and moral dilemmas.

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Ballet: Swan Lake & Other Contemporary Works, 3pm & 7:30pm. Lenfest Center, W&L University. $12.adult | $7/student. 540-463-3436. Come out and enjoy a classic as portrayed by the ballet dancers of the Rockbridge Ballet as they celebrate 30 years of performing in the Rockbridge area.

Live @ The Lab with Brett Twitty & Ryan Russell, 6:00pm, Blue Lab Brewing Company, 123 S. Randolph St., (540) 458-0146.

Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball, 8:00pm, The Robert E. Lee Hotel, Grand Ballroom, 30 South Main Street, Lexington, (540) 461-8484. Advance Tickets: $30/person, $55/couple. Tickets at Door: $35/person, $65/couple. Wear your best mask and join us for a night of reverie with live music and dancing. A decadent horsd’oeuvres buffet including muffaletta sandwiches, beignets and traditional king cake, and cash bar. Prizes for best costumes and the person who finds the baby in the king cake! RSVP by calling the hotel at (540) 461-8484. Be safe – Rooms are available for after the party! Ask our reservations specialist when you call.

Lexington Restaurant Week
DAILY (through February 28th), 8:00am – 11:00pm, Downtown Lexington & Surrounding Area. Dozens of restaurants and food-related retail shops in Lexington will be participating in our Winter Restaurant Week. The theme this year is “Knock the Chill Off!”, with dining and shopping offerings focusing on all things warm, cozy, and delicious. Pick up a postcard listing all the specials and discounts — and enter to win one of over two dozen gift certificates in our Restaurant Week Sweepstakes! Come out of your winter hibernation and join us for a week-long celebration of food.

Wednesday, February 25

Growler Grab Day at the Devils Backbone Outpost, Devils Backbone Brewing Company, Outpost Tap Room, 50 Northwind Lane, Lexington, (540) 462-6200 (every Wednesday). Visit the Tap Room and fill up your 64 oz. growler for $5 on Wednesdays. Each week you can fill up your growler with an Outpost brewed beer at this special price!
WEEKLY Lexington INDOOR Winter Farmers Market, 18 East Nelson Street. Every Wednesday the market will bring you locally produced vegetables, eggs, baked goods, fruit, cheese, honey, chestnuts, and more. For information contact Mitch Wapner at 463-9234.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Trivia Night in the Tap Room Devils Backbone Outpost, 6-8pm, Devils Backbone Outpost Brewery & Tap Room, 50 Northwind Lane, Lexington, (540) 462-6200. Test your knowledge as DB team member Ann leads Trivia Night in the Tap Room. Enter as individual or team up for a great night of beers and friendly competition at the Outpost!
Think n’ Drink Trivia @ Blue Lab Brewing Company, 6:00pm, Blue Lab Brewing Company, 123 S. Randolph St., (540) 458-0146 (every Thursday).

Friday, February 27, 2015

Live @ The Lab, 6:00pm, Blue Lab Brewing Company, 123 S. Randolph St., (540) 458-0146. Enjoy a pint while listening to acoustic rock and roll. Live @ The Lab with Alex Shreve!

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A Distinguished Friend of Oxford University

“Honored, flattered and absolutely floored” is how Ralph Smith, a 1973 graduate of Washington and Lee University, described his reaction to being named a Distinguished Friend of Oxford University (DFO). The awards ceremony will take place in June.

In his congratulatory letter to Ralph, Vice Chancellor Andrew Hamilton noted that the DFO Award “was initiated in 1997 as a way to formally recognize individuals who have acted as exceptional volunteers for the benefit of the university, its colleges and departments.” Ralph was nominated in recognition of his “extraordinary support of the Rhodes Trust and the American Trust for Oxford.”

After graduating from W&L, Ralph attended Oxford University as a Rhodes scholar, where he received an M.A. in politics, philosophy and economics. He earned his J.D. from Yale Law School.

He has been an officer, director or trustee of numerous educational, charitable and civic organizations, including Rotary International and the Association of American Rhodes Scholars. He is the administrator of the Eastman Trust and the American Trust for Oxford University and is also responsible for the Rhodes scholarship selection process in Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana.

In 2013, Ralph was appointed by Queen Elizabeth II to the Order of St. John, an Order of Chivalry of the British Crown, with historical roots in the 11th century Knights Hospitaller and Knights of Malta.

Ralph is president and CEO of The Ralph Smith Group, which provides management consulting services to business and higher education institutions worldwide. He is also special counsel to the law firm, Jones Walker L.L.P., in Birmingham, Alabama.


Executive-in-Residence Leland Miller ’98 to Give Talk on China’s Economy on March 10

Leland Miller ’98, CEO of China Beige Book International, will give a talk, “Demystifying China’s Economy in 2015,” at 7:30 p.m. on Mar. 10 in Stackhouse Theater. This event is free and open to the public.

Investors and policymakers obsess over the growth of China’s economy, but what is actually happening across regions and sectors remains a mystery to those who rely solely on China’s official government data.

Combining the largest private data operation ever to operate in a closed economy with unrivaled connections to sources on the ground, Miller will explain the evolving Chinese marketplace and provide unique insight into China’s true growth, credit and labor dynamics—as well as what Beijing’s leadership has in store in terms of restructuring and reform in 2015.

Tired of unreliable data provided solely by the Chinese government, Miller founded the China Beige Book in 2012. Adapted from methodology used by the U.S. Federal Reserve’s “Beige Book,” China Beige Book relies on its own independent data, collected quarterly, which includes survey data from over 2,000 Chinese firms and in-depth interviews across each of its regions and sectors.

Miller was a history and Chinese major at W&L. He also holds a law degree from the University of Virginia and a master’s degree in Chinese history from Oxford University. A leading expert on China’s financial system, he is a frequent guest on media outlets such as CNBC and CNBC Asia, Bloomberg TV and Radio, BBC, Al-Jazeera and China’s CCTV, among others. His work is featured regularly in such publications as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Bloomberg, TIME, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Forbes, Foreign Policy and The Washington Post.