Feature Stories Campus Events

Money Matters Week Aims to Raise Class Awareness at W&L Money Matters Week, sponsored by the First-Generation Low-Income Partnership at W&L, runs Oct. 1-6.

AdobeStock_105975965-600x400 Money Matters Week Aims to Raise Class Awareness at W&L

A new organization at Washington and Lee University, the First-Generation Low-Income Partnership (FLIP), has planned a week-long series of events that aims to raise class consciousness on campus, start conversations about class, and arm students with tools they can use to navigate financial and logistical hurdles during their college careers — and beyond.

Money Matters Week, which kicks off with a dinner on Sunday, Oct. 1 and wraps up Friday, Oct. 6, will include panel discussions, workshops, brainstorming sessions and a documentary screening. All of the events are free and open to the entire campus community.

FLIP founder Kiki Spiezio ’18 said Money Matters Week was not planned just for first-generation students or those with low socioeconomic status. In fact, she said, the success of the program, and FLIP in general, depends on engagement from all areas of the campus community.

“We would like to see other first-generation, low-income students come out,” Spiezio said, “but we would also love for people who are not to come out so we can really have some good discussions about what it means to be aware of class and other issues like that on the W&L campus.”

Spiezio started FLIP this year, along with her friends Taylor Reese ‘19 and Edwin Castellanos ‘20. After writing an article for Odyssey.com, “5 Ways Washington and Lee Could Better Support Low-Income Students,” Spiezio realized how many people on the W&L campus were interested in talking about the issue and making the university a more welcoming place for everyone.

With support from Student Affairs, FLIP will host the following events:

Sunday, Oct. 1:
Kick-Off Dinner
6-8 p.m., CGL Atrium

Monday, Oct. 2:
Career Navigation 101
With Career Development
3:30-4:30 p.m., Commons 214

Panel Discussion: Why Money Matters
With various professors
5:30-7 p.m., CGL Atrium

Tuesday, Oct. 3:
Investing 101
With the Williams Investment Society
3-4 p.m., Huntley 221

“W&L Thrive Guide” Brainstorm Session
Help come up with tips for first-generation, low-income
students to make the most of their college years at W&L
4:30-5:30 p.m., Commons 214

Documentary Screening: “Inequality for All”
Discussion follows, led by Professor Aly Colón and Sheila Colón
7-9:30 p.m., Hillel Multipurpose Room

Wednesday, Oct. 4:
Budgeting Workshop
With Financial Aid staff
3:30-4 p.m., Commons 114

Faculty/Staff Experience Panel
Hear from faculty and staff who were first-generation
or low-income college students themselves.
5:30-7 p.m., Stackhouse Theater

Thursday, Oct. 5:
“W&L Thrive Guide” Brainstorming Session
3-4 p.m., Commons 214

Visual Journaling Workshop
With Professor Leigh Ann Beavers
(Supplies provided; please bring a photo of yourself)
5-5:45 p.m., Wilson 3040

Student Experience Panel
6-7:30 p.m., Sci A214

UNTOLD Storytelling
The theme of the evening will be related to money matters.
8 p.m., Commons Living Room

Friday, Oct. 6:
Visual Journaling Workshop
12:30-1:15 p.m., Wilson 3040

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W&L’s Woodzicka is Second Speaker in “Equality and Difference” Series

“Woodzicka has done pioneering research on the interpersonal and social consequences of subtle forms of prejudice and discrimination. Most recently, she has been exploring the negative social effects of racist and sexist humor, and that is what she will be discussing with us in her lunchtime talk.”

Julie_Woodzicka-400x600 W&L’s Woodzicka is Second Speaker in “Equality and Difference” SeriesJulie Woodzicka

Julie Woodzicka, Abigail Grigsby Urquhart Professor of Psychology at Washington and Lee University, is the second speaker in the 2017-18 “Equality and Difference” series, sponsored by the Roger Mudd Center for Ethics at W&L. This event will be held on Oct. 3 at 12:00 p.m. in the Hillel Multipurpose Room.

Woodzicka talk, titled “Are All Jokes Created Equal? Differential Effects of Group-Based Disparagement Humor,” is open to the W&L community.

Woodzicka joined the faculty at Washington and Lee in 2000, and co-taught W&L’s inaugural women’s and gender studies introductory course.

“Professor Woodzicka has done pioneering research on the interpersonal and social consequences of subtle forms of prejudice and discrimination,” said Angela Smith, Director of the Mudd Center. “Most recently, she has been exploring the negative social effects of racist and sexist humor, and that is what she will be discussing with us in her lunchtime talk.”

Also a writer, Woodzika is the co-author of numerous articles, including “It’s Just a (Sexist) Joke: Comparing Reactions to Sexist Versus Racist Communications” (2015) and “A Successful Model of Collaborative Undergraduate Research: A Multi-faculty, Multi-project, Multi-institution Team Approach” (2015).

In addition to being a member of several W&L committees, she has served as chairperson for W&L’s Science, Society and the Arts undergraduate research conference and the Institutional Review Board for Research with Human Subjects.

Woodzicka earned her B.A. at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, her M.A. at the University of Dayton and her Ph.D. from Boston College, spending the last two years of her program in residence at Yale University.

The Mudd Center was established in 2010 through a gift to the university from award-winning journalist Roger Mudd, a 1950 graduate of W&L. When he made his gift, Mudd said that “given the state of ethics in our current culture, this seems a fitting time to endow a center for the study of ethics, and my university is the fitting home.”

W&L’s Billias and Goudimova to Perform Selections from Russian Composers

BilliasGoudimova_003164050417_-600x400 W&L’s Billias and Goudimova to Perform Selections from Russian ComposersAnna Billias and Julia Goudimova

Anna Billias and Julia Goudimova, faculty members from the music department at Washington and Lee University, will present “An Exploration of the Russian Soul: Selections from the ‘Mighty Five’ Russian Composers.” The recital is Sunday, Oct. 8 at 3 p.m. in Wilson Concert Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

A duet, “Anima e Grazia,” will share its Russian heritage through the repertoire featuring the music of Modest Musorgsky, Cesar Cui, Alexander Borodin, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Mily Balakirev and will incorporate two instruments, with Billias on the piano, and Goudimova on the cello.

“Through these musical selections, we are hoping to expose our audience to the unique beauty of Russian folk music,” said Billias.

Doors to the concert hall open at 2:30 p.m. for seating.

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W&L’s Staniar Gallery Presents “Hard-wired”

2017.Coney_.Island.Crawler-849x768 W&L’s Staniar Gallery Presents “Hard-wired”Coney Island Crawler

Washington and Lee University’s Staniar Gallery is pleased to present “Hard-wired,” an exhibit by Maine-based sculptor Anna Hepler.

The show will be on view Oct. 5-Nov. 1, with a public artist’s talk and reception Oct. 18 at 5:30 p.m. in Wilson Hall’s Concert Hall. Both the exhibit and the talk are free and open to the public.

“Hard-wired” presents works in ceramic, wood, metal, and paper that reflect the artist’s exploration into the language of visual perception. In Hepler’s process-based approach to creative practice, she allows each new piece to be informed by the last, pushing the possibilities and examining the depths of her materials.

In her artist’s statement she describes the works in this series as portraying “folded, slumped, stacked or intertwined forms in which one material looks or behaves like another. Wood slats mimic hanging rope; woodblocks resemble animal hides; ceramics appear to be made of steel; and wire sculptures drape and flow like fabric.”

Hepler’s work is in many public collections, including the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Tate Gallery in London. Her many distinctions include a residency at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and fellowships from the Maine Arts Commission and Roswell Artist in Residence.

Staniar Gallery is located on the second floor of Wilson Hall, in Washington and Lee University’s Lenfest Center for the Arts. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please call 540-458-8861.

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Making Sense of the Jungle Liz Todd '19 was able to extend her Spring Term Abroad and spend the summer in Brazil, where she worked for an environmental agency.

Todd-2-800x533 Making Sense of the JungleLiz Todd ’19

“I realized that my professors had helped instill an academic drive in me that motivated me to read paper after paper about the region and country on a variety of subjects and drove me to fully immerse myself in the culture here.”

Liz Todd ’19
Hometown: Oldwick, New Jersey
Major: Geology and Environmental Studies
Minor: Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Q: Where did you go this summer?
I had the opportunity to extend my Spring Term Abroad and stay in Brazil to work in Manaus, Amazonas. I worked for the Instituto de Proteção Ambiental do Amazonas (IPAAM), an agency within the government of the Brazilian state of Amazonas that is responsible for the environmental regulation of the Amazon jungle and the interior of the state. I had the opportunity to work in the geoprocessing department, completing projects with ArcGIS, map making, deforestation and environmental analysis/licensing.

Q: What was your favorite aspect of your summer abroad?
Manaus is located in the middle of the Amazon jungle on the bank of the Rio Negro, northwest of the Econtro das Águas, or the meeting of the Rio Negro and Rio Solimões. I loved living in Manaus. Although it is still a developing city, it is teeming with vibrant Amazonian/Brazilian culture and life. However, my favorite aspect of living in Manaus was my proximity to the jungle, the river and the northern waterfall region of Brazil. I was lucky to enough to live and travel by boat upriver during my STA, and, between that and living and exploring the regions around Manaus, I was able to fully experience the wonders of the jungle and the natural spaces here.

Q: What did an average day for you look like?
I usually started my day with a trip to the gym to do my workouts for the track and field team around 5:30 a.m. After a quick breakfast of traditional Brazilian food, I headed to work at IPAAM, which started at 8 a.m. My work ended at 2 p.m., so I had the opportunity to explore the city and culture with my friends. Manaus has a great nightlife and some of my favorite things to do were to head down to the Teatro Amazonas and listen to live music in the beautiful plaza outside or to go play futsal at night once it cooled off. Most nights I ate a late dinner with my wonderful homestay family, then either went out or read papers and books on the region.

Q: What was the most rewarding and fulfilling part of your experience?
I would say it was the exposure I gained. I generally think that people at Washington and Lee are unaware of how privileged they are and the struggles that many other countries and regions experience. Manaus is a rapidly developing city in a third-world country that is experiencing a economic crisis, and it is constantly being rocked by government corruption scandals that jeopardize the already unstable Brazilian government. Living there opened my eyes to many of the challenges that developing regions are facing. Things that I take for granted on a daily basis in the U.S. are considered a luxury here, and common utilities, such as electricity, are extremely expensive and unaffordable to many. As a result, I devoted a lot of my personal time this summer to learning exactly how stability, economic growth, infrastructure, illegal activities, overall quality of life and environmental policies intersect in the Amazon, and how these are developed in a country like Brazil.

Q: What was the biggest challenge you faced?
The biggest challenge was the language barrier. I came to Brazil speaking very little Portuguese. Though I had worked with the university-endorsed program, Mango Languages, the amount of Portuguese I had actually learned before my arrival was inadequate. However, Brazilians tend to be extremely friendly, and though I met very few people in Manaus who actually spoke English, I was able to pick up Portuguese as I went. I don’t have much of a problem understanding, writing and speaking Portuguese after living here for three-and-a-half months. It was definitely a steep learning curve, because my work and a lot of the papers I read were all in Portuguese. Despite the fact that it was tough at first, I’m really glad I was so immersed; Portuguese is a beautiful language, and I love that I can understand the beauty of it now.

Q: Who served as a mentor to you this summer, and what did they teach you?
My biggest mentor was Alex Rivas. Alex is a professor at the Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), and I lived with him and his family. Alex is one of the leading environmental economists in Brazil. He has written multiple books, and most of his work explores the ties between the economy and the environment as it pertains to Manaus and Amazônia. Living with him and being able to ask him questions regarding my work here, and the region, was extremely helpful and enriched my time here immensely. His research and work are areas I am extremely interested in, and I look forward to learning more about it in the future.

Q:What have you learned at W&L that helped you in this endeavor, and what will you bring back to your life on campus?
During my time at W&L the professors in the Geology and Environmental Studies Department have done an amazing job of fostering my curiosity and passion for learning. After my arrival in Brazil, a completely new environment for me, I realized that my professors had helped instill an academic drive in me that motivated me to read paper after paper about the region and country on a variety of subjects, and drove me to fully immerse myself in the culture here.

I think Professor Jeff Rahl, from the Geology Department, has been critical in the development of my ability to ask, and then answer, critical questions, which has definitely served me well here. I also look forward to bringing back aspects of my life here to campus this fall. Learning Portuguese has unlocked a treasure trove of information, and as a trilingual student I look forward to bringing foreign research back to my studies at W&L. In addition to language, I look forward to bringing a new perspective back to campus. It is easy to become ingrained in the Washington and Lee “bubble,” and the ways in which my views have changed will have a positive impact on my life on campus, as well as my academic and athletic pursuits.

Q: Has this experience impacted your studies or future plans in any way?
This experience has reinforced my desire to go into the environmental field. The environmental field is multi-faceted, and I have been lucky enough to be immersed in the heart of that complexity in the middle of the Amazon jungle. I don’t think I could have worked and lived in a better place in terms of gaining real-life experience toward both my majors.

Q: Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?
When you’re on campus, it’s extremely easy to get lost in the rigors of the academics that the school is known for. In terms of personal and academic development, it’s essential to pull yourself out of academia and see the real-life applications of the degrees you’re working toward. In addition to that, experiences like mine can push students outside their comfort zone and allow them to learn in ways that aren’t often available in a traditional academic setting.

Q: Describe your summer adventure in one word.
Quente!

Q: What kind of funding helped make this experience possible?
My work was facilitated by Professor Jim Kahn and made possible by the Johnson Opportunity Grant and a grant from the Washington and Lee Environmental Studies Department. I am extremely thankful to the involved entities because without their generosity and time, my work with IPAAM and my time in Brazil would not have been possible. The funding and help I received is one of the many ways that W&L invests in its students and constantly helps push us to grow as individuals, professionals and academics. The quality of opportunities and resources that the professors and the university make available to students continues to astound me, and I consider myself extremely lucky to have been able to benefit from them in such a profound manner.

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Crystal Doyle ‘09L Promotes Access to Justice with Global Firm DLA Piper

“All of our lawyers in the U.S. are expected to do pro bono work, and I get to help them find matters that connect with their values while helping to bridge the access to justice gap in our country and around the world.”

IMG_0004-400x600 Crystal Doyle ‘09L Promotes Access to Justice with Global Firm DLA PiperCrystal Doyle ’09L

Crystal Doyle‘09L isn’t shy to say she loves her job. That’s because, in her role as pro bono counsel at DLA Piper, she gets to work with the lawyers and resources of one of the largest, most recognized corporate law firms in the world to promote access to justice through pro bono work.

As pro bono counsel, Doyle develops national and international pro bono projects focused on assisting immigrants, promoting women’s rights and combating domestic violence and human trafficking. Based in Chicago, she also maintains her own small caseload of humanitarian immigration matters and oversees all aspects of the firm’s pro bono work in Austin, Baltimore, Dallas, Houston and Minneapolis.

It’s a big job, which Doyle admits is “a bit all over the place,” but she couldn’t be happier. Her work inspires her because she is able to spend her days in ways that matter. “I get paid to help people – amazing.”

She said her colleagues are a really good team. “I deeply respect them. They are friendly, smart and mission-focused.” The team is one of the largest full-time pro bono teams at any law firm in the world, with support for the program coming from “the highest levels of the firm,” said Doyle. “All of our lawyers in the U.S. are expected to do pro bono work, and I get to help them find matters that connect with their values while helping to bridge the access to justice gap in our country and around the world.”

The issues that resonate most with Doyle have always revolved around serving marginalized communities, especially immigrants. She began this work in her role as pro bono specialist at Shearman & Sterling LLP’s New York office before law school, where she was able to assist lawyers working with immigrant clients on family and immigration matters. “I loved the work,” she said. “It’s what convinced me to take the plunge and go to law school.”

W&L Law turned out to be the perfect place for Doyle to study law and prepare for her future. Although she was accepted to several top 14 law schools, Doyle chose W&L because of a generous scholarship and, more importantly, the “quality of the classroom instruction and the feel of the place.” When she visited with other accepted students, she realized “it seemed to be the school I wanted to be at. Everyone was so warm and welcoming, and current students took a lot of time to talk to me and share their experiences.” Many of those students became her friends and mentors when she arrived on campus. “It wasn’t all just a show to get us to sign on.”

She was also impressed with the honor system, the beauty of the campus and surrounding landscape, and most of all, the professors. “We were able to attend a standard first-year class, and the quality of the classroom teaching just blew me away. I had visited a lot of schools and had not seen professors bring the material to life in quite the same way.”

Doyle reminisced about favorite W&L experiences that prepared her for a public interest legal career, including participation in the Shepherd Poverty Program; a summer fellowship that exposed her to the work of public defenders in London, Kentucky; and a year-long externship with an immigrant rights organization in Charlottesville that Prof. Mary Natkin arranged for her.

Doyle was involved in Moot Court as a 2L – both in the mock trial and appellate competitions. As a 3L, she was on the Moot Court board and coached a team that competed on the national level. She credits the mock trial program with preparing her for her first trial as a junior associate at Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP, a corporate firm in New York City, where she started her career as part of the firm’s pro bono fellowship program. During the trial, Doyle represented a survivor of horrific domestic violence in her action for divorce from her abuser. “It was a complex matter, and my notes and textbooks from W&L were my bible for preparing to present that case.”

In addition to practical experiences, Doyle also developed her knowledge of international law while at W&L. She worked under the supervision of Prof. Mark Drumbl to draft a comparative analysis of gender-based asylum for her student note for the Civil Rights and Social Justice Journal, where she served on the board as a 3L. She also fondly remembers attending international human rights law classes with Prof. Drumbl and Prof. Joanna Bond. “It’s such a big part of my current practice, and I’m so grateful to have gotten such a solid foundation from them.”

Besides the academics, Doyle also valued the sense of community at W&L. “Everyone says that law school is cut-throat, but W&L was actually one of the most collaborative, community-oriented experiences I have ever had. It surprised me.”

For example, when she was sick early in the first semester and missed some classes, her classmates “spontaneously sent me their notes so I would not fall behind.” Another time, during orientation, a classmate broke his leg and couldn’t drive or walk. “My small section organized a volunteer schedule to make sure he could get to school and run errands, even though we all barely knew each other. Those experiences really stayed with me.”

Outside of practicing law, Doyle enjoys playing piano and guitar, and actually met her husband, a software engineer, when both played in country cover bands in New York City. The two now make their home in Chicago when she is not traveling the globe for work. “I never thought I would spend so much time at airports, but it’s absolutely worth it.”

Summer Experience: Mark Zhuang ’18L Picks Up the Pace in the U.S. Attorney’s Office

“The attorneys I worked with threw me into the deep end, giving me the chance to figure things out on my own, but were always available to answer questions and point me in the right direction.”

Mark Zhuang, a 3L from Staten Island, New York, graduated from SUNY Binghamton with a B.A. in Biology and Political Science. Mark is a Lead Articles Editor for the Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice. After his 1L year, Mark served as a Judicial Intern to the Honorable Eileen Bransten in the New York Supreme Court-Commercial Division. 

Mark-Zhuang-1-400x600 Summer Experience: Mark Zhuang '18L Picks Up the Pace in the U.S. Attorney's OfficeMark Zhuang ’18L

What did you do for work this summer?

I worked at the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia in Roanoke. I also worked remotely for an alumni based in Denver, assisting on business formation and litigation matters.

How did you find/get this position?

The U.S. Attorney’s Office came on campus to conduct interviews. I signed up for an interview and was fortunate to receive an offer. For my second job, I applied in May when I saw the position posted on SCORE. The attorney reached out to me, and a member of the faculty gave me a great recommendation, which was instrumental in me landing the job.

Describe your work experience.

At the U.S. Attorney’s Office, I worked on criminal and civil matters that our office litigated in federal court. My work involved researching legal issues, drafting motions, appearing in Magistrate’s Court to prosecute petty offenses, and accompanying the assistant U.S. Attorneys to court for criminal and civil hearings.

In my part-time job, I assisted in drafting LLC operating agreements, researching legal issues we faced in litigation, interviewing witnesses, and assisting in trial preparation.

What were some skills you developed this summer?

First, my researching greatly improved this summer, partly because I was doing it almost every single day. Second, I got the chance to tackle writing assignments on my own and to take the lead on substantive motions. The attorneys I worked with threw me into the deep end, giving me the chance to figure things out on my own, but were always available to answer questions and point me in the right direction. Third, my attention to detail great improved. I realized that the little things can make or break a case, and they are vital to being a great attorney.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

Evidence, bankruptcy, CBA (Close Business Arrangements). We ran into evidentiary issues both at the U.S. Attorney’s Office and also at my second job, and having taken evidence, I was able to better understand the issue and know where to start my research. Professor Beth Belmont was also incredibly helpful when our team ran into an evidentiary question that we did not know how to resolve. I ended up texting her with my question, and she got us onto the right track. Judge Connelly’s Bankruptcy class gave me a great understanding of the bankruptcy system, and I was able to hit the ground running on a bankruptcy adversary proceeding in a bankruptcy matter that came up over the summer.

What surprised you about the work you did this summer?

I was surprised at how quickly things moved in criminal cases. Last summer, when I worked for a judge, we only had civil cases, and things got drawn out over years and years. The work at the U.S. Attorney’s Office had shorter deadlines and faster turnaround times, so the attorneys could wrap up a prosecution in a matter of months and not years.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

I loved sitting with the AUSAs and listening to them talking about their experiences over the years—from the crazy things defendants would do to the things they learned over the years.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

I think this summer and last summer really gave the chance to see how legal issues play out in court. I can’t imagine spending years and years of my life on a single case that gets appealed up and down the courts, which is why I would want to go into a faster-paced area of law where all parties have an interest in coming together and finding common ground for a solution. I am still interested in exploring transactional work, but this summer also showed me that white collar crime/internal investigations is a great area of law to explore, so I will also be exploring opportunities in white collar criminal defense.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

I will be continuing my internship at the U.S. Attorney’s Office throughout the school year, and I look forward to continuing my work with the attorneys there.

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Making the Leap to an R1 Institution A summer at UC San Diego gave Katie Volk '18 experience working in a big research environment

“The most fulfilling part of this entire experience has been the clarity I received regarding my future endeavors.”

Katie-Volk-19-800x533 Making the Leap to an R1 InstitutionKatie Volk ’18 spent the summer at UC San Diego.

Katie Volk ’18
Hometown: Lancaster, California
Major: Neuroscience
Minor: Art History

Q: Tell us a little bit about your summer opportunity:
As a second-summer HHMI fellow, I had an opportunity to conduct research at UC San Diego under Dr. Sasha Kauffman in the Department of Reproductive Medicine, studying the effects of stress on reproductive health; namely effects on neurons in the brain as well as levels of reproductive hormones throughout the body.

I am a two-year HHMI fellow, and my grant through that fellowship helped fund most of the summer in San Diego. In addition to that, I also applied for and received a Johnson Opportunity Grant this summer to further fund my travels to UCSD.

Q: What was your favorite aspect of that location?
My parents both grew up in San Diego, and I actually lived with my grandparents over the summer. I’ve always wanted to live there — it’s my absolute favorite city in the nation — so it was an incredible blessing to be in La Jolla for the summer. I would definitely say the ocean is my favorite part of San Diego. Spending afternoons at the beach after work was a regular venture, and the Pacific Ocean is so beautiful.

Q: What did an average day for you look like?
 I woke up at 7 a.m. to spend some quiet time before heading off to work in the lab around 9 (after finding parking over a mile away). Typically, tasks included running PCR gels, cutting mouse brains or handling/checking on mice in the vivarium. When there weren’t any new mouse pups to be checked, surgeries to be performed or brains to be cut, I spent the day shadowing a post-doc lab member or ran PCRs to determine the genotypes of our animals. After work, I typically went to the UCSD campus gym to do my W&L volleyball summer workout, then headed to the beach to relax before heading home for dinner and sleep.

Q: What part of your experience was the most rewarding and fulfilling?
The most fulfilling part of this entire experience has been the clarity I received regarding my future endeavors. While I knew summer in San Diego would be rewarding in itself simply because of my proximity to home and my love for this city, I wasn’t expecting to gain such assurance in knowing what direction I want to head post-graduation. In that way, this summer was unexpectedly rewarding in giving me the insight I needed as to which path to take next.

Q: What was the biggest challenge you faced?
The biggest challenge I faced in the lab was growing accustomed to handling the mice. There are some surgeries and techniques that initially made me uncomfortable to perform, so I definitely had to learn to move past the discomfort. Repeated practice and an embracing attitude toward this challenge were essential in overcoming my initial fear.

Q: Who served as a mentor to you this summer, and what did they teach you?
The lab manager, Ruby Parra, was an incredible mentor for me this summer. Although I got to shadow all of the post-doc members in the lab, Ruby was my primary mentor, walking me through every technique and protocol, teaching me surgeries and handling, etc. She is incredibly organized and her bubbly personality was such a joy to encounter every day. I learned so much from her in just 10 weeks.

Q: What have you learned at W&L that helped you in this endeavor, and what will you bring back to your life on campus?
At W&L, I learned basic research skills that were necessary for my time here at UCSD. Along with this, because of the more personal and intimate style of research at W&L and my ability to learn directly from my advisor, I came into UCSD with a full understanding of WHAT research is. For example, W&L research taught me to question and consider why we do certain techniques, to think about the questions research attempts to answer, and to ponder the meaning of the results research gives us. Without that background, I would be mindlessly performing research tasks at UCSD without grasping the purpose behind the research. I’m also extremely excited to bring back a new technique I learned over summer to my lab this year at school. I hope to apply this new technique to questions that I have regarding the research we’ve been conducting in Lexington.

Q: Did this experience impact your studies or future plans in any way?
This experience has more than solidified my desire to pursue a Ph.D. graduate program in neuroscience or neurobiology. While I entered summer with an open mind, unsure if I would enjoy research at a larger institution, this experience opened my eyes to a bigger research world, which I am excited to participate in. I plan to apply to Ph.D. programs this fall as a result of this incredible experience.

Q: Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?
While research at W&L was indispensable to my initial interest in the area, this experience at UCSD allowed me an opportunity to engage in research on a larger scale. My work at W&L opened up the door for me to pursue research at another institution, and expanding into another lab is something I recommend that all students do, if possible.

Q: Describe your summer adventure in one word:
Refreshing.

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Author and Journalist John Farrell To Speak at W&L Oct. 2

“Jack Farrell’…has been a witness to history, and he has gone back in history to investigate and explain how key figures of our past made their marks, particularly on U.S. politics.”

Book_Cover_Jack_Photo1-400x600 Author and Journalist John Farrell To Speak at W&L Oct. 2John Farrell

Author and journalist John Aloysius Farrell will give a talk, “Richard Nixon and Donald Trump: Two American Presidents and the Politics of Grievance,” at 5 p.m. on Oct. 2 in Northen Auditorium on Washington and Lee University’s campus. The talk is free and open to the public.

Farrell is the author of the critically acclaimed “Richard Nixon: The Life,” a biography of the 37th president of the United States who resigned in 1974 during the Watergate scandal.

“Jack Farrell’s body of work is exceptional,” said Toni Locy, professor of journalism and mass communication. “He has been a witness to history, and he has gone back in history to investigate and explain how key figures of our past made their marks, particularly on U.S. politics.”

Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, described Farrell as “an exceptional writer,” who “examines minor anecdotes and Nixon’s world-altering choices to illuminate his fundamental and contradictory qualities: a mixture of intelligence, ambition, insecurity, paranoia, and deviousness, all put in service to great success and catastrophic failure.”

In a January 2017 op-ed piece in The New York TimesFarrell previewed one of the book’s sensational findings that historians say provided a missing piece to the history of the Vietnam War—Nixon personally directed a secret campaign to scuttle Lyndon Johnson’s October 1968 peace initiative.

Farrell is a contributing editor to Politico Magazine and a contributor to The Atlantic. He had a prize-winning career as a journalist at The Denver Post, National Journal and The Boston Globe, where he worked as White House correspondent and served on the vaunted Spotlight team.

He also wrote “Clarence Darrow: Attorney for The Damned, a biography of one of America’s greatest defense attorneys, and “Tip O’Neill and the Democratic Century, the definitive account of House Speaker Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill Jr.

Farrell’s talk is co-sponsored by W&L’s Department of Journalism and Mass Communications and the Department of History.

Historian and Author Kenneth Noe to Deliver “Remembering Robert E. Lee” Address

Noephoto-400x600 Historian and Author Kenneth Noe to Deliver “Remembering Robert E. Lee” AddressDr. Kenneth Noe

Lee Chapel and Museum presents “Remembering Robert E. Lee” with a speech by noted historian, professor and author Dr. Kenneth Noe on Monday, Oct. 9, at 12:15 p.m. in Lee Chapel. The talk is free and open to the public.

The title of Noe’s talk is “A Storm to Destroy My Hopes: Weather and Robert E. Lee’s Cheat Mountain Campaign.”

Noe will be signing copies of his book, “The Civil War in Appalachia,” in the Lee Chapel Museum Shop on the morning of his talk. The book will be available for purchase at that time.

A native Virginian, Noe is the author of seven books, along with many scholarly articles focusing on the Civil War and Appalachian history.  He is a frequent speaker on the Civil War Round Table circuit and participates in the Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lectureship Program. He was the 2008-09 president of the Alabama Historical Association and currently serves on the Advisory Board of the Society of Civil War Historians. Noe was a Pulitzer Prize entrant and the winner of the 2003 Kentucky Governors Award.

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W&L’s Music Department Presents “An Eclectic Potpourri” Recital

“It is great fun to sing an 18th-century French cantata to the accompaniment of a harpsichord built in the style of an 18th-century French instrument.”

ParkersYen_0004_05041764-400x600 W&L’s Music Department Presents “An Eclectic Potpourri” RecitalGregory Parker, Lori Parker and Ting-Ting Yen

Faculty and students from Washington and Lee University’s department of music will present a recital entitled “An Eclectic Potpourri” on Oct. 1 at 3 p.m. in Wilson Concert Hall. Admission to the recital is free and it is open to the public. The doors will open at 2:30 p.m.

The program will begin with “Tircis et Climène,” a duet cantata by Michel Pignolet de Montéclair. W&L’s Gregory Parker, baritone, and Lori Parker, soprano, will appear in the title roles and will be joined by Ting-Ting Yen at the department’s recently refurbished Watson harpsichord, as well as Maggie Ma ’18 and Emma Rabuse ’20 on violin and cello, respectively.

“It is great fun to sing an 18th-century French cantata to the accompaniment of a harpsichord built in the style of an 18th-century French instrument,” said Parker.

The second piece, also French, is nearly 150 years younger than Montèclair’s cantata. Gabriel Fauré’s “Violin Sonata No. 1 in A Major, Op. 13” was premiered by violinist Marie Tayau in 1877 and will be performed on this occasion by W&L lecturer in music, Jaime McArdle with Yen accompanying on the piano.

The final selection, David Conte’s “American Death Ballads,” is a set of four songs to be performed by Parker with Yen on the piano. The set won the 2016 National Association of Teachers of Singing art song competition and was premiered at the NATS National Conference in Chicago.

“Even though the texts deal with death, they are charged with wide-ranging emotions. As soon as that premiere ended, I went straight to the Exhibit Hall and bought the score,” said Parker.

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Cultivating a Social Media Presence Elora Fucigna '19 completed an internship in social media and marketing for Ground Floor Farm, an urban farm in her hometown of Stuart, Florida.

“As a nature lover, I was happy to be in an environment that valued our earth, and worked to share that goal with the community.”

elora-800x533 Cultivating a Social Media PresenceElora Fucigna ’19 poses in the W&L garden.

Name: Elora Fucigna ’19
Major: Strategic Communication
Minor: Studio Art

Where did you intern this summer?: Ground Floor Farm

Tell us a little bit about that organization: Ground Floor Farm is a relatively new food and community space in Historic Downtown Stuart, Florida. They are part urban farm, part experimental kitchen workshop, part arts and events venue, and part open-source community space. This summer, since it wasn’t Florida’s growing season, they hosted camps, workshops and events to teach community members about gardening, baking, fermenting, cooking, cheese-making, and all kinds of sustainable activities. During the growing season, they produce all kinds of crops, and have a café and farm stand.

Describe your job there: I worked with the owners to help create material for their social media presence in the upcoming farming season, took photos and made write-ups of events at the farm, and made original art pieces and brochures for their use.

What was the best story or project you worked on?

I really enjoyed creating a “mural” wall-spanning art piece that communicated the seasonality of each of their harvests and crops. I worked with the farmer to figure out which crop to highlight each month of their season (September through June in Florida), created pitches for potential designs, and then created the art piece that they hung over a whole wall by their produce stand. It was fun to combine strategic communication and art into one big project!

Who did you meet, such as a source, a story subject or a mentor, that made the most vivid impression on you – and why?

I just loved working with the owners of the farm – they’re three friends who graduated from the same local high school that I went to, and have pursued their dreams to create a friendly, community-centered, and natural environment right in the middle of downtown. I was inspired by their love for the farm, and all of the hard work they put into growing such great sustainable crops. As a nature lover, I was happy to be in an environment that valued our earth, and worked to share that goal with the community.

When did you feel the most challenged and how did you meet that challenge?

I would say I felt the most challenged right at the beginning – I kind of co-created this internship with the owners of the farm, so there was no predetermined set of tasks that I was assigned to. It was up to me to create material, pitch ideas and motivate myself to find things that I thought could help them. It was a little bit daunting at first, but I overcame that worry of “not being right” by just doing research, and coming up with as many ideas as possible to show them. From there, it was much easier to be productive.

What did you enjoy most about the location of the internship?

I was at home, so it was kind of cool to help with an urban farm right smack in the middle of our downtown area. A lot of people in our area still don’t know about it, so being the communications intern was a great way to help spread outreach, and even just invite all of my friends at home to like the page on Facebook.

Will this internship impact the direction of your career in any way?

I definitely think it made me realize that I love learning about an organization, and interpreting that pre-existing vibe into my own style. It’s fun to get a fresh new subject to work on, and it’s even more fun collaborating with the owners, and seeing what they think about your take on it. This summer showed me that I do really love my major, and I especially like incorporating my artsy side.

How did W&L help to prepare you for this opportunity?

I learned about a lot of great content-creating platforms such as Canva and Piktochart in my PR classes, and I would have been at a loss were it not for them. Making brochures was a breeze after creating infographics and other things like that in class (PR 227). My reporting class helped me remember to always double check spelling and facts, and to be as accurate as possible. Finally, I think that the nature of this particular internship was heavily reliant on self-motivation and creativity, rather than someone just telling me exactly what to do – I would say my time at W&L has certainly prepared me for that type of role.

Did any particular grant or other funding, besides your personal funding, help pay for this opportunity?

Yes! I was lucky enough to receive a $500 grant which helped me pay for transportation. I am so grateful for that! My family of four has three cars, and we all worked separate schedules, so we were actually able to use that money to rent a car over summer (there’s no public transportation in our area, since it’s not a big city- just a beach town). I was so grateful for that help.

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Summer Experience: Maya Ginga ’19L goes In House for the Kraft Group

“I enjoy the process of reading case law that largely comprises 1L, but it felt vital to flex my understanding of the law in a “real world,” professional setting.”

Maya Ginga is a second year law student from Boston, Massachusetts. She graduated in 2014 from Elon University in North Carolina with a degree in Political Science. She spent two years in between undergrad and law school backpacking through South America and working for a bio-pharmaceutical company in Cambridge, MA. At W&L Law, she is a Kirgis Fellow, a staffwriter for the Washington and Lee Law Review and an executive board member of the American Constitution Society.

mayaginga2-400x600 Summer Experience: Maya Ginga '19L goes In House for the Kraft GroupMaya Ginga ’19L

What did you do for work this summer?

This summer I interned for the in-house legal department of the Kraft Group in Foxborough, MA. The Kraft Group encompasses all of the Kraft family businesses, including the New England Patriots, the New England Revolution, Rand-Whitney Containerboard, and International Forest Products.

How did you find/get this position?

One of the in-house attorneys is a W&L Law alumna. She posted a summer internship position in our internal job portal (SCORE). I applied directly to her email, conducted a screening interview over the phone with the alumna, and then attended an interview in person a week later with all four in-house attorneys.

Describe your work experience.

My assignments varied greatly due to the Kraft family’s numerous companies. Most of the work I did was related to IFP, a lumber company that has two major sides to their business: trading and finance. The two long term projects I worked on were secured finance transactions with other lumber companies. Other smaller assignments included research projects, a settlement agreement, and a dispute concerning the New England Patriots’ stadium lease agreement with the Town of Foxborough.

What were some skills you developed this summer?

Namely, analytical thinking and verbal communication skills. First, I have no business background, so working on complex finance transactions was totally outside my comfort zone. That required me to think critically about the impact that adding or removing certain clauses would have on the business and legal relationship between the lender and the borrower. Second, I was encouraged to present my findings confidently and concisely. My supervising attorneys stressed the importance of communicating answers to the business in the most straightforward way possible.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

Property and contracts were the most relevant to my summer work. Property because my class conducted a small unit on financing real property, and the secured finance transactions I worked on were a logical extension of similar principles. So while I have not taken a secured transactions course and I have no undergraduate experience in lending or securitization, I could lean on that background when grappling with the deals I worked on.

Contracts was helpful because the work I did was largely transactional and therefore involved drafting and editing contracts. Although I usually started from a template, I often had to add or remove provisions based on the deal. A lot of the concepts I learned in Contracts (i.e. integration clauses, risk of loss) cropped up in the work we did on a regular basis.

What surprised you about the work you did this summer?

I was surprised by how much legal research was involved in a transactional/corporate environment. I assumed that research was more relevant in a litigation role, but there were a number of legal issues I worked on that required legal research to understand the risk involved before entering into a deal or agreement.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

Bringing to life a lot of the concepts I learned during my 1L year. I enjoy the process of reading case law that largely comprises 1L, but it felt vital to flex my understanding of the law in a “real world,” professional setting. It gave me the confidence that the transition from law school to working can be difficult, but rewarding.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

This summer’s job has helped me in a number of ways, some of them more specific than others. The General Counsel at Kraft played a significant role in my 2L summer employment, which hopefully will also connect me to my post-graduate plans. Specifically, he secured interviews for me at firms that I otherwise would not have had the opportunity to interview with. Because he spent the beginning of his career at a Boston law firm, he gave me a lot of insight into various firm’s cultures, strengths, and weaknesses.

More generally, the work I did this summer provided me the opportunity to discuss substantive corporate legal concepts during OCI interviews. All 1L summer experiences are great in their own way, but I was able to speak to corporate law and client relationships during interviews with firms whose clients are similar to the Kraft Group. Because I genuinely enjoyed my summer work to such an extent, it was easy for me to convey that excitement during interviews.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

My summer experience gave me a realistic sense of what an in-house attorney does on a regular basis. Therefore, I’ve chosen my courses in keeping with the work I did this summer. For instance, Close Business Arrangements. Additionally, exercising confidence and clarity in my verbal communications will be especially helpful during 2L competitions.

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Summer Experience: Chris Henry ’19L Gets Real in Real Estate

From the first day, both of my summer jobs required me to work on meaningful projects and create a final work product that was being reviewed and used by superiors.”

Prior to law school, Chris Henry earned a Bachelor of Science in Building Construction from Georgia Tech.  After graduating college, he worked as an engineer for a general contractor in Atlanta where he assisted in the construction of various projects, including multi-family housing developments.  At Washington and Lee, he is involved in the Real Estate Development and Investment Society and Moot Court competitions.

chrishenry-350x350 Summer Experience: Chris Henry '19L Gets Real in Real EstateChris Henry ’19L

What did you do for work this summer?

This summer I spent the first six weeks clerking for Jones Walker’s Atlanta office. I spent the second half of the summer interning at Sullivan Wickley, a real estate developer also located in Atlanta.

How did you find/get this position?

How I got my internships is a testament to constant networking and perseverance. During Christmas break, I began the 1L internship search. I went through all the usual steps of applying for On Campus Interviews, but I also made a point to reach out to any and all contacts I could think of. One of the people I reached out to is a great friend, fraternity brother, and an attorney in Atlanta. I told him that I was looking for an internship, preferably at a firm. He graciously offered to send my resume out to various friends he had in the legal industry. A few weeks later he called me and said that he emailed my resume off to one of his friends he was talking to at a party. It turns out that this friend is a Double General and was looking to hire a summer clerk for his office that specialized in construction law. Given the fact that my undergraduate degree and post-graduate work experience dealt with construction, it was a perfect fit.

For Sullivan Wickley, I simply reached out to real estate developers in Atlanta until I found one willing to take on an intern for a few weeks.

Describe your work experience.

Jones Walker’s Atlanta office primarily practices construction law.  Despite being located in Georgia, the office handles disputes concerning projects located throughout the world. I personally assisted the team by researching various legal issues dealing with complex civil litigation and international arbitration. I would write legal memorandums discussing my findings and briefly describe a legal conclusion. For potential new clients I would go through project correspondence (typically between the contractors and owners) and construction contracts and create an outline that featured a timeline of the project and a brief synopsis of the potential legal issues. I would then pitch my findings to partners so they would know how they should further pursue the issue. I also did a little bit of transaction work. For example, I researched the relevant changes to certain laws in a state. I then revised a standard form contract to address potential issues caused by the changes in the law.

For my time at Sullivan Wickley, I was given the opportunity to observe various aspects of the real estate development process. This experience was particularly good for me because I had many years of experience working for contractors, but had never had the opportunity to work for an owner/developer. I primarily helped prepare and review new lease agreements. I personally drafted multiple exhibits to be used in a new ground lease between Sullivan Wickley and a national tenant.

What were some skills you developed this summer?

I honed my legal research and writing skills. Before starting work, I was never one to jump straight to secondary sources to begin my research. After my first few research projects this summer, I quickly realized just how useful secondary sources can be, especially if you’re researching a new area of law in a state you’re not familiar with.

I also improved my ability to efficiently read contracts. At first, a 300 page Engineering, Procurement, and Construction contract can seem imposing, but with practice, they become easier to digest. You quickly realize which sections are relevant to what you are researching. Both of my internships gave me the opportunity to practice and improve these skills.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

All of the classes I took my first year prepared me, but I would say that legal research, contracts, civil procedure, and administrative law helped the most. It’s a very rewarding experience to see the subjects you studied in the “real world.”

What surprised you about the work you did this summer?

The ease of legal research, writing, and reading contracts. I remember being assigned my first closed memo last fall. Even though the issue, topic, and research was already done for me, it seemed like the most daunting task I had ever faced. I remember spending seemingly countless hours attempting to write a five-page memo. By the end of my summer experience, I could easily research and write a fifteen-page memorandum. Also, at the beginning of the summer I had a hard time locating certain sections in a contract. However, after a little bit of practice, I quickly learned how to digest legal agreements and leases.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

My favorite aspect was knowing that the work I did was not just “busy work” and that I was a true asset to the team. I think the best internships are ones that give you a realistic experience of what it’s like to work after graduation. From the first day, both of my summer jobs required me to work on meaningful projects and create a final work product that was being reviewed and used by superiors to make the final exhibit, brief, argument, and so on. Therefore, my summer experiences provided me with an accurate representation of what it would be like to work full time after graduation.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

After this summer, I am certain that I want to work at a law firm after graduation. Additionally, returning to Atlanta, the city where I lived and worked for over 6 years, has helped solidify my decision to work in the Southeast.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

Working this summer helped to narrow my preferred practice areas to either construction or real estate law. Because of that, I now know what classes I should take my last two years at W&L Law.  I also believe all the legal research and writing I did this summer will greatly improve my performance in any classes I take in the future.

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Poet Susan Stewart Second Speaker in Questioning Intimacy Series

“There is a distinctive, yet often inarticulate knowledge that comes from intimacy with things. Susan Stewart is an expert explorer of this, the mysterious, often dark, and sometimes challenging realm of intimate experience of life and the world.”

Susan-Stewart-600x400 Poet Susan Stewart Second Speaker in Questioning Intimacy SeriesSusan Stewart

Poet and critic Susan Stewart is the second speaker in Washington and Lee University’s Questioning Intimacy series. Stewart’s talk will include readings from her poetry collection “Cinder,” followed by a discussion with Lesley Wheeler, the Henry S. Fox Professor of English at W&L. The talk is Sept. 28 at 4 p.m. in Stackhouse Theater, and is free and open to the public.

“There is a distinctive, yet often inarticulate knowledge that comes from intimacy with things,” said Jeffrey Kosky, professor of religion. “Susan Stewart is an expert explorer of this, the mysterious, often dark, and sometimes challenging realm of intimate experience of life and the world.”

“Cinder” is a collection of poetry from across 35 years of Stewart’s work. The collection approaches varied angles of intimacy from childhood intimacy, to deeply felt perceptions.

Her most recent books of poetry are “Cinder: New and Selected Poems,” “Red Rover,” “Columbarium,” which won the 2003 National Book Critics Circle award, and “The Forest.”

Stewart is an Avalon Foundation University professor of the humanities and director of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at Princeton University.

“In addition to being an accomplished and award-winning poet, she is also an accomplished and exceptional scholar of literature and art whose criticism is especially attentive to the value, experience, and work of making art,” said Kosky.

Southern Environmental Law Center Attorney to Speak on Atlantic Coast Pipeline

Greg-Buppert-288x400 Southern Environmental Law Center Attorney to Speak on Atlantic Coast PipelineGreg Buppert

“I’ve always felt that forests, streams and mountains were literature. I want my kids to have a chance to read those stories.”

Greg Buppert, senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center, will speak at Washington and Lee University on “The Case Against the Atlantic Coast Pipeline” on Sept. 28 in Hillel House at 6 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline is a proposed interstate natural gas pipeline that would cut through one of the most intact conservation landscapes in the Southeast, including Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina. Buppert is leading the Southern Environmental Law Center’s efforts to oppose the project.

“I’ve always felt that forests, streams and mountains were literature,” said Buppert. “I want my kids to have a chance to read those stories.”

W&L’s Environmental Studies Program asks that those interested in attending RSVP by email to EnvStudies@wlu.edu.

Greeting Opportunity with Open Arms Shadowing doctors in Peru allowed Bryan D'Ostroph '19 to practice his Spanish and firm up future career plans in health care.

“International experiences like this are so important to W&L students because it opens them up to the world and allows them to see through a new cultural lens.”

— Bryan D’Ostroph ’19

FullSizeRender-800x533 Greeting Opportunity with Open ArmsBryan D’Ostroph ’19

Bryan D’Ostroph ’19
Hometown:
Whispering Pines, NC
Majors: Neuroscience and Anthropology
Minor: Poverty & Human Capability Studies

Tell us a little bit about your summer opportunity.

This summer, I completed a health care-based internship through the Shepherd Poverty Program in Cusco, Peru. I was thinking about potentially going into a career in global health, so this was a great introduction to the health care system of another country. Also, this was a great way to push my communication boundaries, with Spanish being my day-to-day language.

This internship was funded by the Shepherd International Internship Program Grant, Goldman Sachs Endowment for International Experiences, and Johnson Opportunity Grant.

What was the best part about Cusco?

Cusco has such a rich history, from being the capital of the Incan Empire to the cultural heritage the Spanish left behind during Peru’s colonial period. Exploring this history and visiting some of the famous sites in and around Cusco was my favorite aspect of this beautiful city.

What did an average day for you look like?

An average day had me working at my project site, Polioclinico Belen, for the morning and afternoon shift. Originally, I was observing and assisting the general medicine physician with patient visits, helping to take vitals, performing basic physical exams, and explaining health education information. After that, I shifted roles to being a laboratory assistant and helping the technician with various lab exams (i.e. urinalysis, hematocrit, biochemical analyses, etc.). To ensure that my Spanish was still advancing, I had conversational Spanish lessons two days a week at a school in Cusco.

What was the most fulfilling aspect of your experience?

I think helping with the health education efforts, which combined various doctors and departments in the clinic, was the most rewarding. For some people who come to the clinic, this was their only contact with health care and they seek out the clinic very rarely. By educating them, the hope is that they will take that information back and apply it in their life to be more aware about certain diseases and their risk factors.

What was the biggest challenge you faced?

One of the biggest challenges I faced was sometimes feeling a bit helpless with certain patients. Currently there is a strike of doctors in Peru, leaving the hospitals basically closed. On a few occasions patients would come into us in emergent condition, and since it is an outpatient clinic, there was very little for us to do to help them. It was incredibly difficult sending them away and knowing they weren’t well.

Who served as a mentor to you this summer, and what is the best thing they taught you?

Dr. Kelsing Contreras has been the biggest mentor to me this summer during my internship. On most days, I saw patients with him in the general medicine department. The most valuable thing that he taught me was the culture surrounding health in Peru and how certain cultural norms impact the way he treats patients. For example, he told me that certain populations that live in the mountains surrounding Cusco are somewhat “mystical” with their health care beliefs, so he must incorporate that into his diagnostic explanation. My inner anthropology nerd loves to explore these connections between culture and medicine!

What have you learned at W&L that helped you in this endeavor, and what will you bring back to your life on campus?

First, the Spanish professors and classes that I took at W&L helped to give me the necessary foundation to immerse myself in the culture and communities. Other classes in the Poverty and Anthropology departments gave me examples and case studies that I could apply to certain situations here in Cusco, but one of my favorite mantras is that you can only learn so much from books and lectures. Being in Cusco and experiencing real-life issues that are impacting the impoverished populations firsthand allowed for a whole new type of learning. I will definitely bring back my love for the culture of Peru and I hope to share many of my stories with friends and members of the W&L community.

Has this experience impacted your studies or future plans in any way?

This experience definitely has impacted my future plans. Going into the internship, I was dead set on working in the global health sector. While I still will incorporate global health into my career, I don’t want it to be the sole focus of my career. I was really struck by the close-knit bond the doctors had with their patients, and it made me think about potentially working in primary care in a rural setting in America.

Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?

International experiences like this are so important to W&L students because it opens them up to the world and allows them to see through a new cultural lens. As liberal arts students, we constantly need to learn and expand our horizons so we can bring those experiences to future issues and challenges we will tackle. I have grown so much from this experience and will constantly apply the lessons I learned in Peru to things in the future.

Describe your summer adventure in one word:

Breathtaking

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Jefferson Davis Futch III, Professor of History Emeritus, Dies at 85

Jefferson Davis Futch III, professor of history emeritus, who taught at Washington and Lee University for 46 years until his retirement in 2008, died on Sept. 21, 2017, in Lexington, Virginia. He was 85.

“Though I’ve been here only a short time, I have learned about Professor Futch’s enduring commitment to his profession and his students,” said W&L President William C. Dudley. “My thoughts are with his friends, his former colleagues in the History Department, and the rest of the Washington and Lee community as we reflect on his life and his contributions to the university.”

Futch-Portrait-by-Hinely-400x600 Jefferson Davis Futch III, Professor of History Emeritus, Dies at 85Jefferson Davis Futch III. Portrait by Patrick Hinely ’73.

Watch the memorial service live on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 2:00 p.m. EST.

Futch was born on April 16, 1932, in Baltimore, Maryland, to J.D. Futch Jr. and Mildred Hopkins Futch.

He held an A.B. (1955) in humanities and a Ph.D. (1962) in history from Johns Hopkins University. He titled his dissertation “U.S.-German Diplomatic Relations, 1929–1933.” He served as an instructor in history at Johns Hopkins (1956–1957), held a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship (1955–1956), and studied in Italy (1958).

Futch served in the U.S. Army, in Italy, from 1957 to 1960, which he called “a perfectly mad, simply wild experience.”

He joined the W&L faculty in 1962. He became an associate professor in 1966 and a full professor in 1970. He taught the history of Europe since 1815, of Venice and of the papacy. Futch served on W&L’s admissions committee from 1966 to 1969. He belonged to Phi Beta Kappa and the German Honor Society.

“Dave was revered by generations of W&L history students,” said his longtime colleague David S. Peterson, W&L professor of history. “His lectures, delivered without the aid of notes, are legendary. He was a master of detailed, witty, enthralling historical narration. He will be deeply missed and fondly remembered.”

A long-time contributor to the National Review, Monarche Nuova and Relazioni, Futch also wrote book reviews for the Richmond News Leader, and wrote the preface (in Italian) to an Italian book, “The Conservative Movement in the United States” (1970).

He served on the advisory council of Americans Against Union Control of Government and belonged to the American Historical Association and the Society of Italian Historical Studies.

“He was a renowned teacher, very popular with students and a mainstay in the History Department,” said Provost Marc Conner. “His lectures on 20th-century German history were famous, as was his Spring Term course on the Papacy. He was a champion of traditional conservative thought, and scores of alumni remember him with great affection.”

Futch was honored by students at a 1973 testimonial dinner, and in 1987 he received the William Webb Pusey Award III for outstanding service and dedication to the university. His retirement in 2008 was even noted in the Congressional Record.

Futch, whose pastimes included music and stamp collecting, was famous for requiring male students to wear ties to his classes and in his office long after W&L had relaxed its dress code. “Boys without ties look like juvenile delinquents,” he told the Roanoke Times & World-News in 1977. He provided ties for those who needed one. He also told the Roanoke paper, “Dealing with students is much nicer than dealing with people.”

Survivors include Barbara C. Bull, of Takoma Park, Maryland, and James L. Forestell, of Reston, Virginia.

On Friday, Oct. 6, during Parents and Family Weekend, the Department of History hosted a remembrance of Professor Futch.

On Saturday, Nov. 18, at 2 p.m., a memorial service will take place in Lee Chapel on the W&L campus. A reception will follow at the R.E. Lee Hotel. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Dr. Jefferson Davis Futch III Speaker Forum at The Spectator: A Magazine of Student Thought and Opinion.

 

 

 

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Livestream: Translating Aimé Césaire

Watch “Translating Aimé Césaire: A conversation with A. James Arnold and Clayton Eshleman.” Sponsored by the 2016-18 Center for International Education Colloquium on Borders and Their Human Impact with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the University Library. This lecture was held Sept. 19, 2017.

Watch it online at https://livestream.com/wlu/aime-cesaire.

translating-aime-cesaire-1-1024x576 Livestream: Translating Aimé CésaireLivestream: Translating Aimé Césaire

Livestream: Constitution Day Speaker, Colonel Ty Seidule ’84

Colonel Ty Seidule ’84 gave a public lecture titled “Robert E. Lee and Me: Reflections on Confederate Memory by a W&L Graduate, Soldier and Scholar” at Washington and Lee’s Constitution Day event on Sept. 17, 2017.

The talk was sponsored by the Mellon History in the Public Sphere project, the Office of the Provost and the History Department.

Watch his lecture online at https://livestream.com/wlu/ty-seidule.

ty-seidule-1-1024x576 Livestream: Constitution Day Speaker, Colonel Ty Seidule '84Livestream: Constitution Day speaker Ty Seidule ’84

Livestream: Fall Convocation 2017 with Dr. Danielle S. Allen

Dr. Danielle S. Allen, Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics and James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, presented “Democracy 101: We Hold These Truths….” at Washington and Lee’s Fall Convocation on Sept. 6, 2017.

Watch her lecture online at https://livestream.com/wlu/fall-convocation-2017.

fall-convocation-danielle-allen-1024x576 Livestream: Fall Convocation 2017 with Dr. Danielle S. AllenLivestream: Danielle Allen

‘An Active Participant in Solutions’ Through the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty, Tyra Barrett '18 interned at the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in New Jersey.

“This kind of experience is crucial to W&L students because it allows us to work and to gain experiences firsthand in under-resourced communities.”

WLU1959-800x533 'An Active Participant in Solutions'Tyra Barrett ’18

Tyra Barrett ’18
Hometown: Grayson, Georgia
Major: Biology
Minor: Poverty and Human Capabilities

Tell us a little bit about your summer opportunity:

Through the Shepherd Higher Education Consortium on Poverty (SHECP), I interned at the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers in Camden, New Jersey. Their main goal is to improve the health care system in order to meet the medical and social health needs of patients, particularly those who are high-risk. During the summer, I worked on the Patient Satisfaction Survey project, which assesses patient opinion of their primary care clinic, their demographics, and potential barriers that they may face, such as food insecurity. This is an initiative of the Camden City Accountable Care Organization (ACO), which is a collective of hospitals and clinics within Camden City that collaborate together in order to provide quality healthcare to the patients that they serve. This opportunity was funded by the Williams Endowment for the Shepherd Program at Washington and Lee University.

What did you think about Camden?

While Camden has the reputation of being one of America’s most impoverished and dangerous cities, the city has taken impressive measures to improve its environment. Camden played host to a large number of events, such as concerts, so if we had time, my fellow SHECP interns and I would attend these events. Furthermore, Camden is right across from Philadelphia, so it was extremely convenient to go to Philadelphia sometimes on weekends.

What did an average day for you look like?

My fellow Coalition interns and I met in the morning to have a daily huddle to discuss our game plan for the day, such as which clinics we would visit that day. Afterwards, we dispersed in pairs to different clinics around Camden to sit down and speak with patients about their experience while helping them to fill out surveys. If the clinics were not too busy, we took that opportunity to analyze the data we collected from the survey.

What was the most rewarding part of your experience?

The most rewarding part was the rich conversations that happened with the patients that I had the pleasure to interact with. Through those conversations, I learned more about the realities of what Camden residents faced. Furthermore, these experiences helped to humanize the survey in a meaningful and thoughtful manner.

What was the biggest challenge you faced?

I think the biggest challenge was learning what did or did not work on this project. Often times, we learned the hard way what did not work with this survey, so whenever an obstacle occurred, it was always a situation where we had to pause and reflect on these mistakes. However, through this trial and error, we were able to critically fix the flaws of this project for future interns.

Who has served as a mentor to you this summer, and what is the best thing they taught you?

I would say that my peer Coalition interns were my biggest mentors this summer. We were a tight-knit group, and most of them were completing medical school or some other post-grad degree, so they had a good amount of insight to offer. I think the best lesson that they taught me was that even when a door is shut, it does not mean that it is locked. Furthermore, they taught me that it is OK to take a break in order to find a career that you truly love.

What have you learned at W&L that helped you in this endeavor, and what will you bring back to your life on campus?

At W&L, I learned what it means to be a member of a community. It means being aware of your position within the community that you serve and being an active participant in solutions of issues that affect the community. These lessons in community were particularly useful during my time in Camden. Now that I am back on campus, I hope to bring with me the lessons that Camden residents have taught me in resilience and ingenuity in terms of community improvement.

Did this experience impact your studies or future plans in any way?

This internship has highlighted two major flaws within our current health care system. For one, our current health care system often leaves those who are the most vulnerable, particularly those who live in poverty, the most unprotected. Furthermore, while our health care system focuses on the medical determinants of health, it often neglects the social determinants of health, which are major players of our overall health and well being. These lessons have helped to shape my future plans as I pursue a career in public health.

Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?

This kind of experience is crucial to W&L students because it allows us to work and to gain experiences firsthand in under-resourced communities. This opportunity allows us to learn what obstacles under-resourced communities face and how community organizations are implementing innovative programs in order to conquer these obstacles.

Describe your summer adventure in one word.

Powerful

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

Summer Experience: David Thompson ’19L Advocates for the Right to Health

“NGOs are often times understaffed and underfunded, which enables a self-starter to make a significant contribution to the mission of the organization. PHRI gave me a lot of autonomy and responsibility—especially for an intern.”

J. David Thompson is a 2L at Washington and Lee School of Law. He received his BS in Economics and MBA from Liberty University. Before coming to law school, David served in the U.S. Army. At W&L, he is President of the Washington & Lee Veterans’ Advocates (WLVA) and involved in the Women’s Law Student Organization (WLSO). Separately, he is Co-Director of Service to School JD Operations and a 2016 Veterans in Global Leadership Fellow. Connect with David at www.jdavidthompson.com.

What first attracted you to W&L Law?

One of the things that drew me to W&L was the focus on international law and the opportunities, while still a student, to work with faculty to make a global impact. This proved itself to be true time and time again, and it helped immensely during my internship following my 1L year.

What did you do this summer? How did you find/get this position?

I spent the majority of my summer working for Physicians for Human Rights–Israel (PHRI). In early August, I spent about 10 days traveling throughout Israel on a law and policy tour with Our Soldiers Speak to meet with Members of the Knesset, Israeli Supreme Court, and commanders from the Israeli military.

I knew coming to Washington and Lee that I wanted to eventually work in either national security or in the foreign service. While I plan to work for the government, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) implement a lot of the efforts. In the long-term, interning with an NGO enabled me to better understand the challenges they face and will help me to be a better partner. In the short-term, this internship provided me with the opportunity to make a difference on important human rights issues while learning through hands-on application.

When I was determining in which sector to try to intern, I reached out to a W&L Law alumna that currently works in one of the places that I was considering. We spoke several times and continue to remain in touch. She provided advice on how to make myself the best possible candidate and employee for that position. Those discussions ultimately helped me determine where to look for an internship.

Finding this specific internship took a lot of twists and turns. To me, it was important to find an internship that was the best fit for me rather than accepting the first offer that came along. I found organizations that I thought did meaningful work and sent e-mails asking about internships. When I initially contacted PHRI, there was nothing on their website about accepting interns. If the opportunity wasn’t there, I created it. Fortunately, it worked out well for all parties.

Describe your work experience.

I worked as a legal intern with PHRI, located in Tel Aviv-Yafo. My work focused primarily on using international law to advocate for human rights standards, particularly the right to health, through submissions to the United Nations (UN) and then lobbying foreign diplomats on these issues. This experience allowed me to see how the UN decides which issues to pursue and to see the discussions between Committee members and State parties under review.

Being a native English speaker, I also assisted in non-legal related tasks such as reviewing annual reports for PHRI. I actually really enjoyed this aspect because it allowed me to further be a contributing member of the team and provides insights into other aspects of the organization.

With Our Soldiers Speak, I engaged in dialogue with senior political, judicial, and security figures throughout Israel on law, policy, and security—particularly ways to provide stability and peace in the Arab-Israeli Conflict.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

The things that attracted me to W&L Law initially proved to be very helpful during the internship. During my 1L year, faculty assisted me in publishing internationally on human rights abuses and American diplomacy in Ethiopia. I further worked with a faculty member to document and report abuses by the Government of Ethiopia and its security forces to the UN. The Transnational Law Institute funded participation at a conference at the World Bank, which allowed me to connect and network with practitioners from around the world. Through this experience, I was able to conduct pro bono research for the World Bank Group’s Women, Business, and the Law on the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s penal code to help identify and monitor gender-based discrimination and violence. Recently, the Jordanian parliament repealed one of the major laws highlighted in the research, a law that allowed a rapist to forego punishment by marrying the victim. While these experiences were all intrinsically rewarding and beneficial in the promotion of human rights, they also proved helpful during my 1L summer internship.

As far as classes, the Transnational Law class provided the basis and legal framework on how to approach international law. Having this class as a 1L gives W&L students a competitive advantage in international internships. Conferences hosted by the German Law Journal further helped enable more of a holistic approach to thinking about issues and recommending solutions.

Washington and Lee continued to offer support throughout the summer. Without the scholarships from the Natkin Fund and the Transnational Law Institute, this internship may not have been possible.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

NGOs are often times understaffed and underfunded, which enables a self-starter to make a significant contribution to the mission of the organization. PHRI gave me a lot of autonomy and responsibility—especially for an intern. During the course of this internship, I independently submitted two major reports to the UN: the first for the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and the second to the Committee for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Additionally, I worked with two UN Special Rapporteurs on specific abuses on the right to health and legal responsibilities of the occupying power. It was very rewarding that, as an intern, I had work that I could call my own. With the amount of autonomy, I could schedule my own meetings and work to solve the issues the way I best saw fit. This enabled me to work across multiple departments to broaden my understanding and outreach. It was also intrinsically rewarding that these efforts played a part to help better the lives of others.

In addition to the work, I took the opportunity to travel throughout the country, meet new people, and try new things. Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory are full of historical landmarks and has amazing beaches. While I definitely missed the Blue Ridge Mountains, it was hard to beat the sunset over the Mediterranean. Fortunately, I could take a bus or hitchhike to get to most major landmarks that I wanted to see.

What would you say to someone looking to intern internationally?

While interning overseas for an NGO has truly been a very rewarding and exciting experience, it is not for everyone. There are certain challenges associated with living and working in a foreign country that require a person to be adaptable and independent. The ambiguity and relatively laissez faire approach may not offer the strong structure that some people need to learn or succeed. There are cultural nuances that make interning abroad different that many traditional, legal internships. Further, there is a certain amount of “handholding” that seems more common in some US internships that does not occur much internationally. Despite all of that, anyone who is a self-starter and considering a career in international law, diplomacy, or international advocacy should strongly consider a similar internship.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

I hope to use my experiences to help the next class. These opportunities have proven to be very rewarding and valuable. With the hands-on approach offered by Washington and Lee, I want to help other students that are interested in international advocacy to prepare themselves to take a similar type of internship. The current 1L class is promising, and I plan to continue the W&L tradition of helping others obtain their goals.

Tracking Corporate Social Responsibility Soon Ho Kwon '17 and Claire Meyers '18 spent the summer looking at how Corporate Social Responsibility plays a role in the bottom line.

 This research opportunity has definitely broadened my spectrum on my field of study and has provided me with a clearer understanding of the importance of business ethics.”

— Soon Ho Kwon ’17

Soon-Ho-Kwon-and-Claire-edit-1024x768-800x533 Tracking Corporate Social ResponsibilitySoon Ho Kwon ’17 and Claire Meyers ’18 collaborate in the library.

Soon Ho Kwon ’17

Hometown: Seoul, South Korea
Major: Accounting and Business Administration

Claire Meyers ’18

Hometown: Dayton, Ohio
Major/Minor: Accounting and Business Administration/Mathematics

Q: What did you do over the summer?

Claire: This summer, I worked with Professor Reid, Professor Hess, and a few other students on looking at Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the way companies set and track progress on their sustainability goals. CSR and sustainability have become increasingly important in the past several years, and through this research, we hope to gain a better understanding of how firms are responding to pressures to be more sustainable and how the market is responding to what firms are doing.

Soon Ho: The challenging idea of the weighting between profits and social responsibility is questioned by Alex Edmans, who is currently a finance professor at London Business School. He asked, “Why do businesses exist? Do they exist to earn profit or to serve a purpose for shareholders or for society, customers, employees, and the environment?” As he questioned, my research project explores the accounting concept of materiality in the context of sustainability reporting, a report published by a company or organization about the economic, environmental and social impacts caused by its everyday activities. We are looking at different companies’ sustainability reports and trying to analyze their data in our own format to decide whether they have reached the goals that they set in the beginning of the year.

Q: What was an average day like while you were working on this project?

Claire: At that point in the research, our professors needed the students to compile as much information about these firms as we can. Most days, I went to campus and coded companies’ sustainability reports for several hours in Huntley, and since there wasn’t much need to work together on what we were doing, a lot of times I didn’t even see my other research partners for a few days.

Soon Ho: On my usual days, I woke up pretty early and worked on my research in the morning. My research was pretty independent, so I was able to work anywhere on campus. My usual places on campus to work were CGL and Huntley. I met with my professor once or twice in a week to discuss the probable difficulties that I might face while I did my research. During weekends, I liked to explore Lexington more than I was able to during the academic year.

Q: What was the most interesting thing you learned while working on this project?

Claire: What surprised me the most right from the start was the sheer number of companies that produce these sustainability reports. Although, for the purpose of the research, our sample size isn’t very big, it’s neat to see how many firms across the country and world are taking an active role in giving back to their local communities and reducing their environmental footprint.

Soon Ho: The most interesting that I learned through this project is to distinguish what is really important in business. I began to contemplate work ethic for my own major (Accounting) and future career. As Professor Edmans described it as “conventional view,” many believe that accountants should only focus on analyzing “numbers” in financial statements and provide unbiased understandable financial information (strictly governed by GAAP – generally accepted accounting principles) to users in order to make rational decisions. I personally believe that business exists for serving purpose, and money is just a part of consequences. The modern globalization in economics has promoted to strongly suggest to focus on “numbers” in financial statements as well as economical environment, social responsibilities. By doing this research, I discovered my passion on educating users to not only focus on financial statements but also be more attentive about the sustainability reports.

I also find sustainability reporting interesting because, unlike financial reports, it does not have a set of strict “rules” like U.S GAAP. Due to its characteristic, formats and categories for sustainability reports differ from company to company. This can be troublesome as it makes it challenging for users to compare and use the information.

Q: What was the biggest challenge you faced?

Claire: Because it’s not a requirement for firms to report any kind of sustainability metrics or goals, there are a lot of differences and inconsistencies in the reports that we do have. Even within a company, two reports from two different years could look completely different, and that has made tracking progress and making comparisons somewhat difficult. We’re looking at companies that base their reports on a certain framework, but we’ve come to realize that the level of adherence to that could still be all over the place.

Q: Did you had any mentors during the project?

Soon Ho: Yes, I received so much help from Professor Hess and Professor Reid. Although I was the “research assistant” and was supposed to help out my professors for their research, their support and assistance taught me to overcome difficulties and challenges that I faced. During the discussion sessions, other students and I shared interesting discoveries and ambiguity from the data.

Q: Has this experience impacted your studies or future plans in any way?

Soon Ho: This research opportunity has definitely broadened my spectrum on my field of study and has provided me with a clearer understanding of the importance of business ethics. I was intrigued to learn more about philosophies and ethics that are based on business and accounting in order to understand what kind of work I would want to do in the future.

Q: How did W&L prepare you for this experience?

Soon Ho: Throughout two years at Washington and Lee University, I took several courses that are related to computer management techniques and basic accounting knowledge. These courses have been very helpful to use for the research when I organized forms/sheets to analyze data and understand them.

Q: Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?

Claire: Being able to work alongside professors over the summer on research that is so important to them has been a unique experience. Since declaring my accounting major, I’ve had the pleasure of having both Professor Reid and Professor Hess in the classroom, and I learned so much from them each semester. This summer, however, we’re doing a lot of the learning together. When problems come up, it’s often something they haven’t yet come across either, so we work through it together. When we find cool little things that a company does, we make sure to share it with one another. One thing that especially attracted me to W&L was the small class sizes and the close relationships students were able to form with their professors. Being in the classroom with Professor Hess and Professor Reid, working with them on this research, and our summer barbecue together have all been exactly that, and I couldn’t be more thankful!

Soon Ho: Through this research, I was able to not only understand what I already learned but was able to encompass the new perspective on this field of study and actually made me become more passionate about my future career.

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

Accounting Faculty and Students Represent W&L in U.S. and Denmark

This year, members of the accounting department and accounting students brought the W&L experience to conferences in both the U.S. and Denmark.

Hess-Megan-233x350 Accounting Faculty and Students Represent W&L in U.S. and DenmarkProfessor Megan Hess

The Business of Teaching Workshop at the Copenhagen Business School invited Megan Hess ’97, assistant professor of accounting, to present at the meeting. This student-focused conference brings together teams from European and American business schools and liberal arts colleges and invites them to collaborate and explore how to bring humanities into the business school classroom.

Matthew Rickert ’18 and Hermione Wang ’18, students also attending the workshop, discussed their experiences in Dr. Hess’ newly designed course called, “The Art & Science of Auditing: A Liberal Arts Approach.” The course draws on both technical standards and the humanities to teach students the key auditing concepts of risk, control, materiality, and evidence. Using resources such as books, movies and interviews to motivate discussion, the course balances both the art and science of auditing in a way that is more memorable and engaging than traditional teaching methods.

“I found the conference to be incredible insight on how much planning professors put into their classes. Being there showed me that there are so many multi-disciplinary business problems that people have yet to tackle. Professors who attended the conference were exploring ideas with innovative approaches that were more realistic and applicable beyond the classroom,” said Wang.

“The opportunity to pursue knowledge as a full-time job is incredibly rare,” explained Rickert. “To be given the opportunity to spend a week with people from around the U.S. and Europe, discussing that pursuit and actively searching for new ways to learn was incredible.”

The organizers of the American Taxation Association’s (ATA) Mid-Year Meeting in Phoenix invited Hess to present an award-winning case she had written with Raquel Alexander, formerly associate dean of the Williams School. The two presented “Brewing Up Controversy: A Case Exploring the Ethics of Corporate Tax Planning,” which explores the ethical issues surrounding the corporate tax-planning and tax-avoidance strategies of multinational organizations.

In early August, a several members of the Accounting faculty headed for California where the American Accounting Association (AAA) held its 2017 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Hess presented a paper she has been working on titled, “The Consequences of Accounting Failure for Innovation: A Multi-Level Analysis.”

Fafatas-Stephan-e1505744410318-234x350 Accounting Faculty and Students Represent W&L in U.S. and DenmarkProfessor Stephan Fafatas

Like Hess, Stephan Fafatas, Lawrence Associate Term Professor of Accounting, shared his research results and teaching innovations with colleagues from across the country. As the new vice-president of communications of the Academy of Accounting Historians (AAH), he helped organize their August workshop. He also made a presentation, “Using Historical Accounting Records in Undergraduate Classes,” which focused in part on how to engage students with accounting history in the classroom. Fafatas, who continues to use resources from W&L’s Special Collections for both class projects and his research, showed some interesting images he has gathered from local business records during his talk.

Fafatas also attended the Beta Alpha Psi (BAP) Annual Meeting in Anaheim, CA with Andrew Kim ’18 and Claire Meyers ’18, accounting majors and current BAP officers. The conference brings together over 1,000 students, faculty and professionals and is ripe with networking opportunities as well as exhibitors with information on master’s programs and CPA materials.

“What I enjoyed most about attending the BAP conference was the opportunity to meet with and learn from students and advisors from other chapters all over the country,” said Meyers. “Our chapter here at W&L is so new, and I think we were able to bring back a lot of helpful information for the school year.”

“The opportunity to participate in the professional meeting environment was rewarding for students,” said Fafatas. “They were able to network, attend breakout sessions and hear from professionals in the field.”

The BAP meeting also provided attendees with a rewarding volunteer opportunity in collaboration with the Orange County United Way and the nonprofit organization First Book. The group visited local organizations in undeserved neighborhoods to distribute books and teach children the importance of literacy. The program provided each child with a brand-new book of their own. Since 2013, Beta Alpha Psi has given out nearly 16,000 books during their Community Service Day event.

W&L Alumnae Brunch 2017


Summer Experience: Daniele San Roman ’19L Splits Her Summer in the Delaware Courts

danielsanroman-800x533 Summer Experience: Daniele San Roman '19L Splits Her Summer in the Delaware CourtsDaniele San Roman ’19L

Daniele San Román is a 2L originally from Long Island, New York. She graduated from Penn State University in 2015 with a degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Daniele worked as a paralegal at the Department of Homeland Security for a year before attending W&L. She is a Junior Editor for the German Law Journal, a Hearing Advisor, a Law Ambassador, a Westlaw Student Representative, Treasurer for SEIPLS, and a chair for the WLSO Symposium. Outside of class, Daniele enjoys running, hiking, and watching Penn State Football.

What did you do for work this summer?

This summer I worked at the Delaware Courts, and I split my summer between two of the courts. For the first four weeks, I worked for The Honorable Vice Chancellor Slights at the Court of Chancery and the latter four weeks, I worked for The Honorable Judge Parkins at the Superior Court.

How did you find/get this position?

I found this position through another W&L student who interned for Judge Parkins after his 1L year. The student told me that Judge Parkins takes summer internships seriously. Judge Parkins provides feedback on writing assignments and does his best to expose his interns to as much as possible. I sent my resume to Judge Parkins and he offered me the position. After I accepted, Judge Parkins reached out to Vice Chancellor Slights to arrange for myself and his other intern (another W&L student) to split our summers between the two Judges’ Chambers. Both judges are W&L Alumni and are good friends, and Vice Chancellor Slights was happy to work with us.

Describe your work experience.

In both courts, I attended proceedings almost daily and was exposed to a variety of areas of law across numerous cases.

The Delaware Court of Chancery determines a substantial amount of corporate litigation, and I saw incredibly talented lawyers in oral argument representing a variety of high profile clients, from pharmaceutical companies to food network stars. The issues often seemed insignificant at face value, but there was always a considerable sum of money involved in the verdict. Vice Chancellor Slights typically asked for my thoughts before and after argument, and never hesitated to fully explain and discuss the proceedings. I was given the opportunity to work on the first draft of an opinion for the Vice Chancellor, which was an incredible.

The Delaware Superior Court is a trial court, and while I worked for Judge Parkins, he was on a criminal rotation. I saw first-hand the considerable discretion judges have and how difficult some of the choices they have to make can be. I was fortunate to work during a criminal trial and see voir dire, witness examinations, and opening arguments. (The defendant took a guilty plea before closing arguments.) I helped edit numerous opinions, researched a variety of legal issues, and wrote recommendations for Judge Parkins on defendants’ motions for modification of sentence. Judge Parkins always took the time to discuss my thoughts and edits and shared his thoughts as well.

I was fortunate to work with two judges who dedicated so much time to teaching me. I was exposed to how judges think and it was interesting to learn about the factors they would consider.

What were some skills you developed this summer?

My editing improved greatly this summer, and I developed a much keener eye for details and grammatical errors. I became more comfortable in the court room, as well as around attorneys and judges. One of the most important skills I developed this summer was an increased confidence in my abilities. In the beginning of the summer I often felt overwhelmed and constantly worried that I would not be able to do the work I needed to do. As I continued working, I realized that I do know the law and I can handle the work put in front of me.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

In the Court of Chancery, I saw a lot of cases involving contract law and tort law. Contract law was more prevalent and most cases were regarding specific performance or an injunction. I saw how important every detail in a contract can be. Civil procedure was helpful to understand a lot of what was happening in the court room and what the attorneys were referencing regarding future steps. Criminal law was very helpful to understand the criminal cases, although Delaware has very confusing sentencing that nothing could have prepared me for. I also utilized what I learned in Professional Responsibility in both courts when evaluating attorneys’ actions and questions of recusal.

What surprised you about the work you did this summer?

I was surprised by the number of cases being processed and worked on simultaneously. There always seemed to be a staggering amount of work to do on various stages of the different cases. At times, it was difficult to keep track of everything we needed to work on. I was also surprised by the relationships between the attorneys. Generally, the attorneys were not only cordial, but appeared to be friends. Between proceedings in the criminal trial, the defense attorney and prosecutor would discuss the prosecutor’s upcoming wedding, for example.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

My favorite aspect was sitting in on oral arguments. Reading briefs in preparation and watching the arguments unfold through the argument seemed very analogous to preparing for class, which was a welcome exercise. I enjoyed watching the attorneys think on their feet and hearing their (mostly) intelligent and eloquent answers as the judges poked holes in their arguments. I also was always interested in looking into the attorneys’ backgrounds to see what training and experience had shaped their styles.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

Before this summer, I didn’t think I would be interested in applying for a judicial clerkship, but I enjoyed this experience so much that I am considering it. Judge Parkins’s clerk left in mid-July to take a position at a firm, which gave me the incredible opportunity to work as a pseudo-clerk for two weeks. I really enjoyed working so closely with Judge Parkins, and was fortunate to see his considerable intelligence and knowledge of the law first hand.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

I was fortunate to experience many different things in this position. Some I really enjoyed, and others not so much. This helped to affirm the areas of law I am interested in and the areas of law I am not. It encouraged me to think about taking different courses in my future at W&L to better compliment my interests.

Related //

Sydney Internship and Study Abroad Program: A Unique Study Abroad Experience

238E52D9-348A-4A77-B941-4A18B31D69B1-800x533 Sydney Internship and Study Abroad Program: A Unique Study Abroad ExperienceSISAP students at the University of Sydney

The Sydney Internship and Study Abroad Program (SISAP) is the only program at W&L that provides students with both a study abroad experience and up to two internship opportunities during the same semester. In fact, students enrolled in this program are required to complete at least one internship (either in the U.S. or in Sydney). This program is also unique because students attend the University of Sydney as opposed to taking classes from a study abroad provider. While housed in off-campus apartments, students take a full course load and experience all the benefits and extracurricular activities offered by a top tier university.

Students can work with W&L’s Office of Career and Professional Development to find 6-8 week domestic internships before leaving for Sydney in late February. Those completing this program earlier this year interned with a variety of firms including the Big Four accounting firms (Deloitte, EY, KMPG and PwC) non-profits, start-ups, real estate investment trusts and corporate advisory firms.

Amanda Whalen ’18 and Caroline Holliday ’18 completed both domestic and international internships. For her U.S. internship, Amanda worked for EY in Columbus, Ohio, where she was trusted with substantial and varied work. She was given opportunities that helped to determine whether she truly wanted to pursue public accounting. “The U.S. internship gave me valuable work experience and skills,” said Amanda. “It was great to be able to intern during the busy season to get a better feel for the work I will be doing. I got to see what the environment was like under high-stress situations.” In Sydney, she completed a second internship in the internal audit department at Scentre Group.

Caroline completed a U.S. internship in EY’s D.C. office within the assurance practice division. “I was able to network with incredible people at EY,” said Caroline. In Sydney, she interned at Stone & Chalk, an independent, not-for-profit Fintech hub. “I loved my internship. It was exactly what I wanted to do in a cool, hip office,” said Caroline. “The work I did felt purposeful and was actually used and appreciated. I learned so much from working with all the start-ups there.”

According to the students that participated, one of the fun aspects of this program is orientation in Cairns where students visit the Great Barrier Reef. “While the trip out to the Great Barrier Reef was choppy to say the least, the views of the Australian coastline and mountains were indescribable,” said Robyn Cleary ’18. “Our group saw all sorts of animals, from sea turtles to blacktip reef sharks, and my personal favorite – many species of parrot fish.”

During the program, students wrote blogs about their individual experiences. In addition to highlighting their Australian adventures, these posts provide a first-hand experience of what it is like to study at the University of Sydney, complete an international internship and more. You can read those blog posts here.

The SISAP program is open to juniors majoring in accounting, business administration, economics and public accounting. A minimum GPA of 3.3 is required at the time of application. Those interested in the 2018 program should access Job ID #6254 through LexLink. The application deadline is Friday, September 29. The program coordinator, Professor Afshad Irani, will be available to answer questions at the upcoming Study Abroad Fair on Thursday, September 21 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Leyburn Library. There will also be an information session that day from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Huntley 235, where Professor Irani along with SISAP alums and representatives from our third-party vendor will be present.

Preserving Snippets, Smidgens and Scraps of History Mary Catherine Greenleaf '19 collected and archived artifacts revolving around the Prohibition-era murder of Franklin Crosby Bearse.

MC-Greenleaf-800x533 Preserving Snippets, Smidgens and Scraps of HistoryMary Catherine Greenleaf ’19

“My passion lies within the realm of the Digital Humanities — that combination of art and computer science — and having the chance to explore this field was an invaluable experience for me.”

Mary Catherine Greenleaf ’19
Hometown: Erie, Pennsylvania
Majors: Computer Science and Studio Art

Q: What was your summer research project?
I assisted Clover Archer, director of the Staniar Gallery, in her long-term art project — the investigation of the unsolved murder of her great-grandfather during Prohibition. Though this project began as a glimpse into her personal history, it has transcended its original confines and shifted into a meaningful investigation of granular history. Though memories of who we are as individuals will disappear through time, people leave behind objects that lend clues to their past lives. Clover is searching for these objects in order to piece together the lives of the people surrounding her great-grandfather to illustrate the significance of each individual life and story. I am assisting Clover with creating a digital archive to house these stories, as well as doing research, filming, and existing as a piece of this performance art as a staff member of the Institute for Clew Studies.

Q: What did an average day for you look like?
My office was set up in the corner of the mostly empty Staniar Gallery in the Lenfest Center for the Arts. Sometimes I scanned objects and drawings, retyped articles and hung artwork on the gallery walls. Other days, I fought with web design — coding with CSS and PHP to create a website — prototype specialized fonts, and attempt to create solutions to unique problems and ideas that have risen within the archives. Every day I greeted visitors to the office, provided tours of the project, and kept a logbook chronicling my efforts that will become its own part of the archive.

Q: What was the most interesting thing you learned while working on this project?
The process of coding a website taught me interesting and invaluable skills, and I think I really learned how to look into something I’ve never learned and alter it to make it do what I need it to. I came into the project not knowing CSS or PHP, but through trial and error I began to understand it and utilize it to my advantage.

Q: What was the biggest challenge you faced?
Not knowing any coding and having to dive into web design head first was definitely my greatest personal challenge. I overcame this challenge and created a workable website with the desired design, though it definitely wasn’t an easy process getting there!

Q: Did you have any mentors during this time?
Clover was a wonderful mentor to me over the course of the summer. She directed me and aided me throughout the project, and I really feel as if I grew a lot as a person through her guidance. I strove to make her design goals a reality, and, in the process, learned an incredible amount. She challenged me to complete tasks I never thought I could accomplish (learning CSS, for example), and we worked together to create a product that we both can be proud of. She encouraged me to include my own passions in this project, such as designing a game based on the archives and creating an infomercial about the Institute, and she put great emphasis on making this a worthwhile experience for both of us.

Q: Did this experience impact your studies or future plans in any way?
This experience served to really emphasize to me how much I love my field of study and that I’m going down the right path. My passion lies within the realm of the Digital Humanities — that combination of art and computer science — and having the chance to explore this field was an invaluable experience for me. It really affirmed to me that I know what I love and that I have the ability to further pursue my passions.

Q: How did W&L prepare you for this experience?
The Digital Humanities program at W&L really prepared me for this experience. They guided me and taught me what I needed to know in regards to web design and were always available to help whenever I felt as if I was stuck indefinitely at a coding-created roadblock. My liberal arts education also helped in general; I am free to pursue my two seemingly separate passions of art and science, and combine them into something beautiful.

Q: Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?
This allows for hands-on experience doing something unique and interesting, and really gives you a sense of the variety of research options and opportunities any field of study may have.

Legal Historian Al Brophy to Speak on Debating Slavery at Washington College

Brophy-Alfred-400x600 Legal Historian Al Brophy to Speak on Debating Slavery at Washington CollegeProf. Alfred Brophy

On Friday, Sept. 29 at noon in the Millhiser Moot Court Room, distinguished legal historian Alfred Brophy, the D. Paul Jones Professor of Law at the University of Alabama, will deliver a lecture at Washington and Lee School of Law titled “Debating Slavery and Freedom at Washington College 1831-1861.”

In his talk, Prof. Brophy will discuss the ideas about law and constitutionalism at Washington College—and in Lexington more generally — in the thirty years leading into Civil War. He details the shift from Enlightenment ideas about freedom —even if circumscribed by economic reality — to the reluctant embrace of slavery, because it was part of the Constitution.

In contrast with Virginia Military Institute, where pro-slavery and pro-secession ideas were more prevalent, Brophy argues that at Washington College there were a wide range of ideas related to Union, slavery, utility, sentiment, Republicanism, and constitutionalism.  He says Washington College and Lexington emerge as important formulators of the Southern response to changes in the United States in the years leading into Civil War, as Southerners discussed the mandates of jurisprudence and constitutionalism and the future of slavery and Union.

Livestream Available 9/29: https://livestream.com/wlu/alfred-brophy

Prof. Brophy’s lecture is part of a yearlong series, “Washington and Lee: Education and History,” during which the university will bring over a dozen intellectuals, scholars and writers to campus to talk about history, how educational institutions interact with history, and what a university’s responsibilities are to history.

Prof. Brophy scholarship ranges from property, trusts and estates to race in colonial, antebellum, and early Twentieth Century America. He is currently working on a book about the idea of equality in early twentieth century African American thought and its influence on the Civil Rights Movement, titled “Reading the Great Constitutional Dream Book: The Black Origins of Brown.”  In addition, he is co-editing a volume on slavery and universities.

Prof. Brophy is the author of “University, Court, and Slave: Proslavery Thought in Southern Colleges and Courts and the Coming of Civil War” (Oxford University Press, 2016), “Reconstructing the Dreamland: The Tulsa Riot of 1921” (Oxford University Press, 2002) and “Reparations Pro and Con” (Oxford University Press 2006), co-author of “Integrating Spaces: Property Law and Race” (Aspen 2011), and co-editor of “Transformations in American Legal History: Essays in Honor of Morton Horwitz” (Harvard 2009 and 2010).

Prof. Brophy received his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania (summa cum laude), a J.D. from Columbia University, where he served as an editor of the Columbia Law Review, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Before entering teaching in 1994, Prof. Brophy was a law clerk to Judge John Butzner of the United States Court of Appeals (Fourth Circuit), practiced law with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in New York, and was a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities at Harvard University.

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Dudley Inaugurated as Washington and Lee’s 27th President

“If the martial arts are the disciplines that prepare you for war, the liberal arts are the disciplines that set you free.”

Washington and Lee University inaugurated William C. Dudley as the university’s 27th president in a ceremony on the Front Lawn of the campus Saturday, Sept. 16.

Inauguration activities kicked off Friday afternoon with a panel discussion on “Liberal Arts and the Professions.” The panel was moderated by Suzanne Keen, dean of the College and Thomas H. Broadus Professor of English. Panelists were Kelly Evans Chemi ’07, representing journalism; William H. Miller III ’72 representing finance; Dr. Harold E. Varmus representing medicine; and the Hon. Gregory H. Woods representing law. The panelists, all of whom received undergraduate degrees from liberal arts institutions, discussed the benefits of a liberal arts education, and the resulting influence on their varied careers.

WLU_3201-600x400 Dudley Inaugurated as Washington and Lee’s 27th PresidentInauguration Panel

Saturday’s inauguration ceremony began with a performance of “America Singing,” an original composition by Shane Lynch, associate professor of music, and commissioned in celebration of the inauguration. The piece was performed by the University Singers, accompanied by students Bethany Reitsma ’20 and Tiffany Ko ‘20 on the violin, Allie Jue ’20 on the viola and Emma Rabuse ’20 on the cello.

Greetings were offered on behalf of faculty by Theodore C. DeLaney, associate professor of history, and Joan M. Shaughnessy, Roger D. Groot Professor of Law. Mary S. Woodson, director of publications, spoke on behalf of the staff; T. Mason Grist ’18, president of the student body, spoke on behalf of students; Michael R. McGarry, ’87, president of the Alumni Board of Directors, represented alumni; and Lexington City Council member Marylin E. Alexander welcomed Dudley on behalf of the community.

Following introductions by Gregory M. Avis, former chairman of the Williams College Board of Trustees, and Steven G. Poskanzer, president of Carleton College, Dudley addressed the crowd gathered for the ceremony. In his remarks, Dudley built on the foundation laid by Friday’s panel in stressing the importance of the liberal arts in today’s world.

KRR_9516-600x400 Dudley Inaugurated as Washington and Lee’s 27th PresidentPresident William C. Dudley

Dudley began by clarifying the meaning of liberal arts with a comparison to the martial arts. “The ‘martial arts,’ literally, are the disciplines that prepare you for war,” said Dudley. “If the martial arts are the disciplines that prepare you for war, the liberal arts are the disciplines that set you free.

“The main impediments to freedom are ignorance and alienation,” he continued. “Freedom means not being governed by things we don’t understand, by societies in which we are not recognized, by political institutions that do not represent us. Liberal arts education increases our knowledge of ourselves, of the natural world, and of the legal, economic, moral, political, historical, and cultural dimensions of human life.”

In describing the value of a liberal arts education, Dudley said that, “although liberal arts education is the antithesis of job training, it also happens to be the best form of professional preparation. It expands our horizons, develops our capacities, and increases our flexibility. Nothing could be more valuable than that in the 21st century. The liberal arts are not soft and weak but, like the martial arts, devastatingly powerful.

“The problem we face is not that liberal arts education is insufficiently valuable. The problem is that the highest quality liberal arts education is so valuable there’s a moral, social and political imperative to make it more widely available and affordable. This is a challenge of scale that no single institution can solve, but to which Washington and Lee does and must contribute.”

Dudley reiterated the importance of both continuing to work to achieve greater racial and social diversity on Washington and Lee’s campus, and set a goal of raising resources to become “one of fewer than 40 schools in the entire country that practice need-blind admission, while continuing to meet 100% of the demonstrated financial need for every student.”

SOC091817_33-600x400 Dudley Inaugurated as Washington and Lee’s 27th PresidentPresident Will Dudley’s Inauguration

In addition, he cited the university’s role in making an important contribution to the current debates about the ways that the histories of slavery, the Civil War, and segregation are told and memorialized.

“The histories of our namesakes and of our institution and of our nation are delightfully deep and multi-dimensional,” said Dudley. “It is a pleasure, as well as a necessity, to read them slowly, with open minds and an appreciation of nuance, with humility that mitigates against easy judgment, never forgetting that disagreement is compatible with mutual affection, and that respectful conversation facilitates communal cohesion rather than corrosion.”

In closing, Dudley offered a reminder of the enjoyment associated with teaching and learning. “What we do here is also a sheer joy…Time on a college campus is a gift. Let us not forget to celebrate.”

In attendance at the inauguration were past university presidents H. Laurent Boetsch, Jr., who served as acting president from 2001-2002; Thomas G. Burish, president from 2002-2005; Harlan R. Beckley, acting president, 2005-2006; and Kenneth P. Ruscio, who served most recently from 2006-2016.

In addition to the past presidents, students, alumni, faculty and staff, delegates representing 65 universities and colleges, and five learned societies and educational organizations, were present for Saturday’s event.

The full text of Dudley’s remarks can be found online: https://www.wlu.edu/presidents-office/speeches/inauguration-address

A video of the inauguration can be found at: https://livestream.com/wlu/dudley-inauguration

A Message to Students from the Executive Committee

To: Members of the Student Body
From: The Executive Committee

Earlier this morning, a Student Body Resolution was posted online. The resolution represents the conviction of many student leaders representing the Executive Committee, the Student Judicial Council, the Student Bar Association, Residence Life, the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, the Student Association for Black Unity and Hillel, who over the past couple weeks have worked on drafting and signing the resolution to reaffirm our commitment to civil dialogue and interaction within our community. While we think it is important that our administration has committed to institutional reflection, we also want people to know that our student body will not stand for rhetoric that is hateful or disrespectful during these conversations. The resolution can be found at https://www.wlu.edu/executive-committee/student-body-resolution, and we hope you will sign it and join us in these important discussions throughout the year.


Summer in Shanghai Laura Wang '19 interned for the Shell company in Shanghai, putting her communications skills to the test and making new friends along the way.

“I’m still very curious and passionate about working in advertising and PR, and would love to plan my next internship in that direction, but this internship opened me to a new direction.”

Laura Wang ’19
Major: Strategic Communication

Where did you intern this summer?

Shell (China) Ltd.

Tell us a little bit about that organization:

Shell is known as one of the biggest oil and gas companies. It is based in the Netherlands and incorporated in the United Kingdom. Shell is ranked No. 7 on the 2017 Fortune Global 500 list of the world’s largest companies. Over the years, Shell has developed a business not just in the fuel commonly seen at gas stations, but also in lubricants, bitumen and renewable energy. In the Chinese lubricant market, Shell is the No. 1 international owned brand.

Describe your job there:

I worked for Shell China’s commercial road transport oil brand, Rimula, as a marketing intern. My job on the CRTO Transport team (it’s basically the Rimula marketing team) included: doing data analysis to identify Rimula’s potential volume growth in different channels and cities; calling truck drivers and Rimula Club members to get feedback on consumer activity from the past March to May; communicating with an agency to design brochures in order to reach out to more fleet customers in different industries; contributing to Rimula’s biggest activity of this year, EPE final, in designing competitions, rules and questions; going to market visits (to the truck accessory centers) and talking to lubricant business owners in order to make an overall plan for developing volume on Franchise Workshop customers.

What was the best story or project you worked on?

The best project I worked on is participating in the whole planning process for CRTO marketing 2018, with a special focus on developing volume on Franchise Workshop (FWS) customers. I knew when I first came to Shell that I would be working on FWS in the later part of my internship, but I had no idea those huge amounts of data and those long-distance market visits would make up a crucial part in the whole 2018 FWS planning. I started out not knowing what FWS was, but I went on to see and learn about our potential customers in market visits, make proposals about new sales opportunities in FWS, and analyze huge amounts of data on truck population, Shell’s penetration and market share. Finally, I helped incorporate all those small tasks and conclusions into our market plan for FWS in 2018. It feels so good to know that those small things I did will make a big difference on the whole marketing plan next year.

Who did you meet, such as a source, a story subject or a mentor, that made the most vivid impression on you – and why?

My project manager, who specializes in fleet and FWS in our team, walked me through from not knowing anything about truck and lubricant to finishing a planning pack with her. My boss, the line manager of the whole CRTO transport team, gave me a lot of insights on the whole Chinese market, the whole marketing field and the relationship between Party A (a company like Shell) and Party B (advertising, PR and media agencies). When I first attended the planning meeting with some colleagues in our team and the representative from the advertising agency, I started learning about the relationship between Party A and B. The whole meeting and the collaboration later made me change my impression about the advertising agency, and even made me reconsider my future career path.

When did you feel the most challenged and how did you meet that challenge?

I think I was most challenged in dealing with huge amounts of data and trying to analyze that data to get a conclusion. The data I got were huge, bigger than I could have ever expected  I think each Excel sheet had about one million data. I had to calculate those data and conjugate different sheets. It drove me crazy to input the data one-by-one. However, later I found in a new market report that the creator had made a pivot table in order to better see the sum of each sector and analyze data, so I applied the pivot table in my data analyses, and my colleagues also taught me how to use “VLOOKUP” to find the exact data I needed.

What did you like best about the location of the internship?

Shanghai is amazing. I was born and raised in the third biggest city in China, Guangzhou, and I have traveled to Shanghai a couple of times, but Shanghai still amazes me every time I see a new district. I moved to three different apartments throughout this internship, and I could explore something new in each area. Shanghai is a city combined with both old and new, domestic and international. Shell’s office is located in the transportation center in Shanghai, five minutes’ walking distance from the railway station and 15 minutes walking distance from the airport. Although it’s not the city center, the government is trying to make that area the new Central Business District. There are three newly opened shopping malls around the office building, and we had so many choices for lunch every day. One of my friends, W&L alumna Susan Ma ’16, and her boyfriend, traveled in Shanghai for couple of days. While I showed them around, I was also exploring the city deeper and deeper.

Will this internship impact the direction of your career in any way?

This is a question I’ve been thinking about a lot after the internship. I used to be very dedicated to working in an advertising or PR agency. I knew I wanted to work in that industry right after I graduated and work there for a long time. However, after having meetings with agencies and talking to my colleagues, I’m not sure if that’s the only way I can go. Big companies like Shell keep recruiting young elites in different fields (there were nine people in my team, and six of them, including me, were under 30). The ideas and plans that agency people can think of, company people may also be able to think of, and they know more about the field they’re working in. So it makes me reconsider my career direction. I’m still very curious and passionate about working in advertising and PR, and would love to plan my next internship in that direction, but this internship opened me to a new direction of working in marketing and communications.

How did W&L help to prepare you for this opportunity?

Information Technology Literacy definitely helped me on my Excel skills, which are very important in marketing. Because all the documents and emails in Shell are written in English, the writing class and Journalism 201 helped me with writing quickly and accurately in my second language. The experience of working as a Phonathon Caller also helped me a lot in this internship, as I needed to call a lot of truck drivers and customers. My colleagues were worried about me dealing with people from a totally strange field, but because I’ve been calling a lot of alumni and their parents from completely different fields, I had confidence talking to strangers through phone calls, and I ended up really enjoying conversations with those truck drivers.

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

UVA’s Brandon Garrett to Speak on The End of the Death Penalty

garrett_brandon_2017-800x533 UVA’s Brandon Garrett to Speak on The End of the Death PenaltyUVA Law Professor Brandon Garrett

Brandon Garrett, the White Burkett Miller Professor of Law and Public Affairs and Justice Thurgood Marshall Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, will give a lecture on the death penalty at the W&L Law this month.

Garrett’s presentation is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 21 beginning at noon in the Millhiser Moot Court Room, Sydney Lewis Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

The talk is titled “End of its Rope: What Explains the Decline in American Death Sentences?” and is based on Garrett’s forthcoming book “End of its Rope: How Killing the Death Penalty Can Revive Criminal Justice.” A book signing will follow the lecture.

Between 1984 and 2014, the use of the death penalty has seen a dramatic decrease in the criminal justice system. In trying to understand the reason for this decline, Garrett gathered and analyzed national data on the issue, and in doing so, discovered what he believes can be a catalyst for criminal justice reform.

Garrett joined the UVA law faculty in 2005. His research and teaching interests include criminal procedure, wrongful convictions, habeas corpus, corporate crime, scientific evidence, civil rights, civil procedure and constitutional law. Garrett’s recent research includes studies of DNA exonerations and organizational prosecutions.

In addition to “End of Its Rope,” Garrett has published a book examining corporate prosecutions titled “Too Big to Jail: How Prosecutors Compromise with Corporations.” His 2011 book “Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong,” examines the cases of the first 250 people to be exonerated by DNA testing. That book received an A.B.A. Silver Gavel Award, Honorable Mention, and a Constitutional Commentary Award. He is also the author of a casebook titled “Federal Habeas Corpus: Executive Detention and Post-Conviction Litigation,” co-authored with Lee Kovarsky.

Garrett’s work has been widely cited by courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, lower federal courts, state supreme courts, and courts in other countries, such as the Supreme Courts of Canada and Israel. Garrett also frequently speaks about criminal justice matters before legislative and policymaking bodies, groups of practicing lawyers, law enforcement, and to local and national media.

Garrett attended Columbia Law School, where he was an articles editor of the Columbia Law Review and a Kent Scholar. After graduating, he clerked for the Hon. Pierre N. Leval of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He then worked as an associate at Neufeld, Scheck & Brustin LLP in New York City.

W&L’s Williams School to Host Sixth Annual Entrepreneurship Summit

“The Entrepreneurship Summit is an amazing opportunity for W&L’s entrepreneurial alumni and students to share stories of success and of failure, to gain access to valuable resources.”

Summit-600x400 W&L’s Williams School to Host Sixth Annual Entrepreneurship SummitEntrepreneurship Summit

Washington and Lee University’s Williams School will hold its sixth annual Entrepreneurship Summit Sept. 29-30 with keynote speakers Ben Johns ’78, founder and CEO of SCOUT Bags, and Warren Stephens ’79, chairman, president, and CEO of Stephens Inc. The talks are open to the public. Both speakers will give their addresses in Stackhouse Theatre on Sept. 29. Johns will be at 11:15 a.m. and Stephens at 1:25 p.m.

Johns has supervised and owned seven different companies and has managed up to 500 employees over the course of his career. Johns and his wife, Deb, own SCOUT, a company that came from a merger of Park Designs and Bungalow to create a line of tote bags that blended fashion and function.

Stephens began his career as an associate in the corporate finance department at Stephens Inc. Today, he is president and chief executive officer of the company. Under his direction, Stephens has grown its footprint from one corporate office, based in Little Rock, Arkansas, to 25 locations across the U.S. and with offices in London and Frankfurt.

“We are extremely excited about the upcoming Entrepreneurship Summit,” said Jeff Shay, the Johnson Professor of Entrepreneurship. “It is an amazing opportunity for W&L’s entrepreneurial alumni and students to share stories of success and of failure, to gain access to valuable resources. By the end, I guarantee that everyone will walk away energized and invigorated!”

The Entrepreneurship Summit was launched in 2012 and has quickly become one of the university’s signature alumni events. The 2016 event included over 120 alumni and more than 200 students who came together to network and learn from each other. The event takes place over two days, a Friday and Saturday, and culminates with a networking dinner on Saturday night.

This year’s summit will feature more than 60 speakers who hold degrees from virtually all of W&L’s majors and is especially targeted around entrepreneurs who want to run their own company or for students from all majors who want to hear from alumni who’ve started businesses from scratch. The summit is open to the public during the day and a complete schedule of events can be found here.

Registration is required to attend the event: https://www.wlu.edu/williams-school/events/entrepreneurship-summit/registration.

W&L Presents Faculty Piano Recital with Timothy Gaylard

Gaylard_0023_0504164-400x600 W&L Presents Faculty Piano Recital with Timothy GaylardTim Gaylard, professor of music at W&L, will present a faculty recital of the final Beethoven piano sonatas on Sunday, Sept. 17 at 3 p.m. in the Wilson Concert Hall. The recital is free and open to the public.

Professor Gaylard spent his sabbatical this past winter term immersing himself in three sonatas, which include Op. 109,110, and 111. All three have iconic status and represent the climax and fruition of Beethoven’s lifelong obsession with the sonata as a genre. He read about them, analyzed them, listened to them on countless recordings and practiced them in preparation for this recital.

“Beethoven’s last piano sonatas present many technical challenges, but they yield wonderful musical rewards,” said Gaylard. “I look forward to sharing this adventure with the audience Sunday afternoon in Wilson Concert Hall.”

A reception will follow in the atrium of Wilson Hall. For more information, call the Lenfest Center Box Office at 458-8000.

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All Up In Wilmington’s Business Elly Cosgrove '19 stayed busy this summer with internships at the Greater Wilmington Business Journal and WECT (Channel 6).

“I was always looking for new opportunities, but asking to take on more responsibility was pretty intimidating at first. However, I got over this intimidation and grew as a person because of these experiences.”

Internship-Headshot-800x533 All Up In Wilmington's BusinessElly Cosgrove ’19 holds up issues of the Greater Wilmington Business Journal and WILMA Magazine, where she was a summer intern.

Major: Business Journalism

Where did you intern this summer?

I had two internships in my hometown of Wilmington, North Carolina. One was at the Greater Wilmington Business Journal and the other was at WECT News Channel 6. I received a Reynold’s Scholarship to help pay for these opportunities.

Tell us a little bit about those organizations.

Greater Wilmington Business Journal has a strong online presence and a biweekly print newspaper. Online articles come out daily. It also has an email subscription and sends out a daily newsletter along with breaking news alerts via email.

WECT (Channel 6) is one of the local TV stations serving Wilmington and the surrounding areas. The station is a Raycom media station and is also an NBC and Fox affiliate. Along with the regular WECT local news, Fox Wilmington is also produced in at the station.

Tell us a bit more about your jobs there.

At the Greater Wilmington Business Journal, I wrote articles for both the business journal and WILMA Magazine (a women’s magazine that is published in the same offices). I wrote many articles on various different topics such as the local arts economy, business profiles, trends and achievers, and accolades. I also received some practice posting to different social media platforms (predominately Facebook). I wrote web blurbs for our newsletters and other short articles such as spotlights, restaurant round-ups and achievers.

At WECT, I shadowed reporters and practiced shooting footage with them while they were in the field. I learned a lot about video and how to look for the best shots. In fact, this experience made me more confident in my ability to operate a heavy-duty camera and how to take quality shots. After being in the field with reporters, I would go back to the station and create my own package. I wrote my script, edited my own video and recorded my own voice over. It was a great experience because I got to see what the turnover is like in broadcast news. It is a very fast-paced environment! The reporters  and sometimes even the anchors  would always read my scripts or watch my packages for me and give me helpful feedback. I even had the opportunity to go out into the field for breaking news. Some of my footage even made it into the breaking news story.

What was the best story or project you worked on?

My favorite story that I worked on for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal was one about a McDonald’s franchisee who owns 15 McDonald’s locations in the Wilmington area. His company is called McAnderson’s Inc. and he has been a franchisee since 1974, so he has seen so much change over the years. I really enjoyed speaking with Mr. Anderson and having the opportunity to tell his unique story. He is quite the businessman and has impacted so many lives in the Wilmington community through the amount of jobs his company provides. He creates a great working environment for his employees and loves to serve his costumers. I really enjoyed writing about such a passionate person.

I mentioned this earlier, but my favorite story for WECT was the breaking news story I was able to help cover. I went out into the field with a news reporter and we got a tip about a huge fire in the area. It turned out the tip was legit, and we were on the scene of a huge structure fire before the first respondents had even arrived! The reporter I was with had to act quick in order to get shots of the fire, so she had me take videos with a phone while she got footage with her camera. I sent all my phone videos into the newsroom and the raw video was actually included in the breaking news online article. It was such an adrenaline rush. I also helped track down witnesses for the reporter I was with so she could keep getting her B-roll. She later interviewed this witnesses. No one was injured in the fire, thank goodness, as it was a vacant building. It was such an adrenaline rush and time absolutely flew while we were covering this story.

Who did you meet, such as a source, a story subject or a mentor, that made the most vivid impression on you – and why?

Honestly, everyone I met made such an impression on me. I grew up in Wilmington and lived in the area for 18 years. However, both the experiences allowed me to meet such important and interesting people in the Wilmington community that only increased my appreciation for my hometown.

At the Greater Wilmington Business Journal, Dennis Anderson, the McDonald’s franchisee, made the most vivid impression on me. He was just so passionate and was in the business for more than 40 years. I really enjoyed my time speaking with him.

I also loved my mentor at the Greater Wilmington Business Journal. She was the editor for both the business journal and WILMA magazine and she guided me throughout the entire summer. If I had interned at a larger business journal, I probably would not have had the same experience. My mentor, Vicky Janowski, went over my articles with me line-by-line. It was incredible, and I received great feedback. I don’t know how many interns can say that they got to meet with the editor every single day to go over their articles. She helped improve my writing so much over the course of the summer and also helped me find my voice as a reporter.

I had incredible mentors at WECT, as well. My intern coordinator, Jon Evans, is also one of the anchors. He was incredibly encouraging and really helped me with my voice. I know that sounds funny, but my voice overs improved so much over the summer because he coached me on how to have a broadcast voice. Also, the reporters I shadowed were always so willing to help. They would always read over my scripts and give advice where they could. I learned how to write for the ear and write in a way that catches people’s attention because of these mentors.

When did you feel the most challenged and how did you meet that challenge?

I felt most challenged when I needed to take initiative and ask for things to do. I was always looking for new opportunities, but asking to take on more responsibility was pretty intimidating at first. However, I got over this intimidation and grew as a person because of these experiences. I felt more comfortable asking for things to do and ways to get more experience.

Did anything about the location of your internship really excite you, such as the food, architecture, outdoors, etc.?

Wilmington is a BEAUTIFUL place (I might be a little biased considering it’s my home). It’s right on the coast of North Carolina and the beaches there are wonderful. I also loved being able to go home and spend time with my family.

Will this internship impact the direction of your career in any way?

I entered the summer convinced that I wanted to do broadcast. However, by the end of the summer I’m really not so sure anymore! I loved my print experience and enjoyed the process behind each article. I still would love to do anything sports-related and hope that I can get some experience at a sports publication next summer.

How did W&L help to prepare you for this opportunity?

Journalism 201 helped prepare me for the business journal opportunity. However, I still have not taken beat reporting and I feel like that would have helped me so much for the WECT internship. W&L has also made me a more confident individual in general, and I think this confidence translated well into my internships.

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

Grappling with the World’s Complexities The Shepherd Poverty Program set Victoria Kumpuris Brown ’98 on the path to a career in philanthropy.

BrownVictoriaK_001_080215__-800x533 Grappling with the World’s ComplexitiesVictoria Kumpuris Brown ’98

“I wrote a letter to the leadership of the university framing my concerns and calling for a more entrenched service program for students. Professor Beckley championed my letter and my dawning observations and invited me to become his work-study for a new program he was forming which later became the Shepherd Program.”

Victoria Kumpuris Brown ’98 is a senior program officer at The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, where she focuses on leveraging the power and innovation of the private sector to build a Culture of Health for all Americans. Before working in philanthropy, she was with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation and American Heart Association. During her tenure, Victoria secured commitments from Coke, Pepsico and Dr. Pepper to reduce calories consumed by all Americans from sugar sweetened beverages by 20 percent by 2025; got McDonalds to introduce affordable healthy options, transform their marketing practices and remove soda from kids meals across 85 percent of their global business and got leading health insurers to cover preventative services for health and well-being for children and families. She is a member of the Shepherd Alumni Advisory Committee.

Q: How did the Shepherd Program shape your years at W&L?
In the fall of 1994, I arrived in Lexington full of excitement and not just a little angst about what my college years would bring. Washington and Lee both mirrored and was completely opposite of my upbringing in Little Rock, Arkansas. While I grew up with a family who supported me wholeheartedly financially and emotionally, I was a graduate of public schools where I was the racial and ethnic minority for most of my schooling and was exposed to diversity, poverty and adversity from my earliest days as a student. Fate took good care of me as I was assigned Professor Harlan Beckley as my freshman-year advisor. Not many of these relationships end up with your advisor and his family attending your wedding but, to say the least, this match was one I will always be grateful for. 

Professor Beckley guided me when I struggled with navigating a student body that was very unlike the one I graduated from. I struggled with the privilege around me along with my own and how disconnected it felt from academic pursuits. What was the ethical and moral responsibility of such a fortunate student body to both give back to their community but also more deeply understand their obligation to serve others given all the benefits their education and station afforded them? In an unusually brave moment, I wrote a letter to the leadership of the university framing my concerns and calling for a more entrenched service program for students. Professor Beckley championed my letter and my dawning observations and invited me to become his work-study for a new program he was forming which later became the Shepherd Program. 

Suffice it to say, I was far from his best student. I remain grateful for him taking that risk as my involvement with the Shepherd Program — while then only in its infancy —  has had a lasting impact on my life. I have spent my career serving others via the public, private and non-profit sectors. I am now in philanthropy and have the unreal job of giving money to causes and strategies to transform lives and communities. I could not have imagined I would end up here but, I know that being listened to and encouraged by Professor Beckley and having the exposure to the Shepherd curriculum set me on the path to finding my life’s work.

 Q: Why is this program important for W&L?
The Shepherd Program has proven to not only transform individuals but, has also transformed the student body it serves. I now return to Lexington to find a more engaged group of young people who are directly grappling with the world’s complexities and what their obligation is to make things better. I have also had the benefit of several Shepherd students completing their internships with me. Their commitment to mission-driven work, dedication and insights have made them tremendous ambassadors for both my alma mater and the Shepherd Program.

While I have always been proud to call myself a General, this new spirit has only deepened my connection to the school. I also believe the program attracts a higher caliber of student to Washington and Lee. What was at one time a niche set of course offerings for a small group of students has evolved into a robust program and unique point of differentiation for my alma mater. As I reflect back, I am so grateful that when I began to grapple with one of life’s big questions — what is poverty and what is our responsibility to address it  — I had a professor who guided me, an intellectual framework to support me and an institution that championed asking these questions. This is liberal arts education at its best.


‘The Quality of the People’ Swimmer, computer coder, and Speaking Tradition advocate Will McMurtry '18 chose W&L over nine other schools, in large part because of its community.

“College is the ideal time to go out of your comfort zone, and I think that’s something we should remind ourselves of constantly, not just the first weeks of school.”

William_McMurtry-800x533 'The Quality of the People'Swimmer, computer coder, and Speaking Tradition advocate, Will McMurtry ’18 finds that putting yourself out of your comfort zone helps you grow.

Q. How did you first hear about the Johnson Scholarship?

My brother-in-law played against W&L in football in Lexington. He told me that he wished he had looked into the school when he went to college and recommended that I check it out. After doing some investigation about the school, I recognized how great of an opportunity the Johnson Scholarship is.

Q. Were you considering any other colleges when you applied for the scholarship?

I became really excited about W&L when I visited campus for the Johnson Scholars weekend. I applied to more than 10 schools, including top-ranked universities, and was accepted into all of them. I found that W&L offered the perfect combination of what I was looking for, and the scholarship was just a bonus.

Q. Why did you ultimately choose W&L?

There are a lot of good colleges with nice campuses, strong academics and a unique character. I felt that W&L went beyond that with its student body. All the students I met on my visit seemed like they genuinely enjoyed going here. Everyone has something unique about them, whether it be a special talent or an interesting story, that makes you look at them in a completely different light. Additionally, the professors here are very engaged with their students and their success.

Q. How has Johnson affected your views on leadership and integrity – or on academics?

I have learned that leadership takes on many different forms. Some situations make strong, vocal leadership necessary; others require a more nuanced approach. Part of being a leader is recognizing what approach you need to take.

Society often teaches that integrity comes at a cost, that maybe if you weren’t honest you could make your life easier in some way. I have found this to be the furthest thing from the truth. Integrity is the most efficient and productive way, for both you and others, to conduct yourself.

Q. What is your favorite story about your W&L experience – if you had to pick one?

This past summer, I interned with a congressman in Washington, D.C. Every single time I wore something with the W&L logo, I’d have a stranger say something to me about it. One of these times was at the line for the Dunkin’ Donuts in the house office buildings. The line was moving very slowly because the cash register was not taking credit cards. I ended up speaking with a former W&L law student for about 20 minutes. When we reached the end of the line, I realized I did not have any cash. He ended up buying my coffee and giving me his business card. This was the first time I had actually experienced the strong relationship the alumni have with W&L.

Q. Do you have a mentor on campus?

I don’t have a mentor per se, but I am very reliant on my peers. I’d like to give some shouts out to Tommy Thetford, Noah Schammel, Jack Baird, Chase Leeby, Jake Burns, and many others.

Q. What extracurricular are you involved in right now that you are extra-passionate about?

Being a Teaching Assistant for the Introduction to Programming class was a great experience. It’s fun to watch the First-Year students grow and develop their skills throughout the semester as they find a genuine interest in the subject. Professor Lambert had to miss a lab session last semester to attend a conference, leaving me and the other TA to run the lab ourselves. It was a difficult process, but the students really showed their independence.

Q. What is your favorite campus tradition or piece of history?

The Speaking Tradition can be awkward at times, but I believe it brings a lot to our campus. I was visiting a friend over winter break and, as we were walking around the campus, I greeted a student who was walking past us. He completely ignored me and seemed really taken aback. We often overlook the cordial atmosphere that the Speaking Tradition brings us.

Q. If you could travel back in time, what advice would you give to first-day-on-campus you?

I think that during the first few weeks of school, it’s important to reassure yourself that everyone else is as nervous as you are and to trust that things will work out in the end. College is the ideal time to go out of your comfort zone, and I think that’s something we should remind ourselves of constantly, not just in the first weeks of school.

Q. If someone asked you “why choose W&L” – what is the one reason you would tell them?

I would want to emphasize the quality of the people who make up Washington and Lee. The campus, academic reputation, social life and facilities are all secondary to the people you are actually interacting with on a daily basis. I visited a lot of colleges during the application process, and W&L offered, by far, the most down-to-earth, compelling and motivated student body.

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

A little more about Will

Hometown:
Covington, KY

Major:
Computer Science

Extracurricular involvement:
Varsity Swimming, Computer Science Teaching Assistant

Why did you choose your major?
The feeling of accomplishment after finally getting computer code to work is something I did not find in the other classes I’ve taken at W&L.

What professor has inspired you?
Professor Lambert has both a unique passion for teaching and a well-refined ability to elucidate difficult material to his students.

What’s your personal motto?
If you want something badly enough, everything else will fall into place.

Best place to eat in Lexington? What do you order?
Don Tequila’s House Special

What do you wish you’d known before you came to campus?
How different college life actually is from your previous life. People tell you it’s different, but you don’t really understand how until you go through it.

Post-graduation plans:
Currently unsure. I plan to work in software development after graduating, but I don’t want to place any limitations on what I may end up doing. If I haven’t found anything I passionately enjoy by age 30, I plan to open a restaurant.

Favorite W&L memory:
My freshman year some of my friends came to our swim meet at VMI. It meant a lot that people went that far out of their way to witness one of the less-exciting sports to watch.

Favorite class:
CS 210 – Computer Organization. You learn how computers work from the ground up.

Favorite W&L event:
I always enjoy exam week. It’s one of the few times where I have no obligations outside of class, and self-scheduled exams allow me to relax and study at my own pace.

Favorite campus landmark:
Cyrus McCormick statue, although the new natatorium may end up topping it.

What’s your passion?
Communicating with peers, whether it be exchanging ideas or simply having fun.

What’s something people wouldn’t guess about you?
I’m half Puerto Rican.

Why did you choose W&L?
A combination of many things, but mainly the students here seemed happier than those at the other colleges I visited.

W&L to Host Pulitzer Prize-Winning Washington Post Reporter David A. Fahrenthold

“David Fahrenthold …blends old-fashioned, knock-on-doors, wear-out-your-shoes reporting with the latest social media tools such as Twitter to figure out what’s going on.”

Fahrenthold_glamour_shot-400x600 W&L to Host Pulitzer Prize-Winning Washington Post Reporter David A. FahrentholdDavid A. Fahrenthold (Photo by Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

Washington and Lee University’s journalism and mass communications department, along with the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, will host Washington Post reporter and CNN contributor David A. Fahrenthold on Sept. 26 in Stackhouse Theatre at 5 p.m. His talk, titled “Journalism in the Time of Trump,” is free and open to the public.

Following the talk, Fahrenthold will be available to sign his book “Uncovering Trump: The Truth Behind Donald Trump’s Charitable Giving (2017).” The book, a collection of articles from the Washington Post, chronicles then-candidate Trump’s foundation and philanthropic claims.

“David Fahrenthold is one of the hardest-working journalists covering one of the toughest beats in Washington,” said Alecia Swasy, Reynolds Professor of Business Journalism at Washington and Lee. “He blends old-fashioned, knock-on-doors, wear-out-your-shoes reporting with the latest social media tools such as Twitter to figure out what’s going on.”

Fahrenthold won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Trump’s philanthropic claims as well as his story disclosing comments Trump made during an unaired portion of a 2005 interview on “Access Hollywood.” He has been at the Post since 2000 and previously covered the D.C. police, the environment, Congress and the federal bureaucracy.

Fahrenthold’s talk will be streamed live at https://livestream.com/wlu/david-fahrenthold.

journalism-age-of-trump-1024x576 W&L to Host Pulitzer Prize-Winning Washington Post Reporter David A. Fahrenthold

Shenandoah Editor R.T. Smith Receives 2017 William Peden Fiction Prize

Rod_Smith-400x600 Shenandoah Editor R.T. Smith Receives 2017 William Peden Fiction PrizeR.T. Smith

R.T. Smith, Shenandoah editor and Washington and Lee University writer in residence, won the 2017 William Peden Fiction Prize, presented by The Missouri Review for the best short story chosen from their four issues published in the last year. Smith’s winning story is titled: “The Satans.”

“Receiving the Peden Prize certainly pleases me, and it’s made all the sweeter by my affection for “The Satans,” which is raw, mythic and, I hope, at once vernacular and inventive,” said Smith. “Set in Appalachia, it’s about the devil and old beanstalk Jack, fellows we’re all a little familiar with.”

Novelist Phong Nguyen judged the competition and personally chose Smith’s short story as the winner. Due to his teaching schedule, Smith will accept the award and give a reading via teleconference during the upcoming conference in Missouri.

Recently, Smith also published a poem in “Scribner’s Best American Poems 2017,” edited by Natasha Trethewey. The collection of 75 poems will be released this month. Smith’s poem is entitled “Maricon” and originally appeared in Prairie Schooner, a literary journal at the University of Nebraska.

Smith, the author of 14 books, teaches courses in the W&L English Department and previously taught poetry writing at Virginia Military Institute. He has twice received a Library of Virginia Book of the Year Award for his books “Messenger” (2001) and “Outlaw Style” (2007).

W&L’s Reeves Center Celebrates 50th Anniversary and Grand Re-opening

“This center is here for the students as well as the community. We wanted to update the building so it could also be a more useable teaching space.”

Washington and Lee University’s Reeves Center this year will celebrate its 50th anniversary and its grand re-opening after six months of renovations.

There will be two open houses for the anniversary and re-opening of the center. The first will be Sept. 26 from 2-6 p.m., with the second taking place during Parents and Family Weekend, on Oct. 7 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Visitors of the center will experience a newly renovated atrium that will house highlights from the collection. Renovations also include a new painting gallery that will display Louise Herreshoff’s work and double as a handicapped-accessible classroom.

Ron Fuchs, curator of ceramics and manager of the Reeves Center at W&L, hopes to see the collection used as a teaching tool across curricula.

“This center is here for the students as well as the community. We wanted to update the building so it could also be a more useable teaching space,” Fuchs said. “We even had students come in last year and just study for exams because it was quiet, and that’s fine with us.”

Reeves2-600x400 W&L's Reeves Center Celebrates 50th Anniversary and Grand Re-openingReeves Center

Other rooms in the Reeves Center received fresh coats of paint, updated lighting and new wall-mounted mahogany casing that will house various pieces of the collection, including Chinese porcelain export, Japanese porcelain, armorial porcelain (coat of arms), and British and continental European ceramics.

The Reeves Center is located in an 1842 house on the campus. Today, thanks to gifts and bequests, the Reeves collection is one of the most extensive in the United States.

The Watson Pavilion, behind the Reeves Center, houses the Senshin’an Japanese Tea Room, by Sen Genshitsu, 15th-generation grand master of the Urasenke tradition of tea.

The Reeves Center and Watson Pavilion are open Mon. – Sat., 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Renovations to the center, including the Elisabeth S. Gottwald Gallery, were made possible by donations from the Herndon Foundation, members of the family of Elisabeth S. Gottwald, and John Goadby Hamilton ’32.


Running for Office If elected, David Thomas ’15 hopes to focus on making local government more responsive to the needs of his community

David-Thomas-261x350 Running for OfficeDavid Thomas ’15

David Thomas, a 2015 graduate of Washington and Lee University and the fiscal officer for Austinburg Township in Ohio, announced in the Star Beacon that he’s thrown his hat into the ring for the county auditor’s seat.

For the last two years, Thomas has worked as Austinburg Township’s bookkeeper and was Grand River Academy’s assistant director of advancement and alumni relations.

“In my current position as Austinburg fiscal officer, I have focused on making local government more responsive to the needs of our community by being transparent in our finances and our decision making,” Thomas wrote in a release.

“I share policy updates and financial information with our citizens, and advocate for our residents on issues important to them. These actions help develop certainty, trust and confidence in government, which spurs investment in our area.”

Thomas, who is working on his M.B.A., told the Star Beacon he’s not running on a partisan platform, rather on policy and a “leadership is service” ideal.

He plans to work with the current 40-some staff members in the auditor’s office, but wants to make the auditor’s roles and authorities more accessible for lay folk.

“Every relationship we can build is important at our county level now,” he said. ”It’s a customer service mentality … being able to go the extra mile for the average person who’s coming in to ask about why their property tax is increased or being able to really sit down and spend the time with a farmer whose tax bill has quadrupled over the last few years,” he said.

While at W&L, Thomas interned with former Rep. Steve LaTourette (14th District); Ashtabula County President Commissioner Casey Kozlowski, who was the 99th District’s state representative at the time; the Republican National Committee in Washington, D.C.; and with Rep. Dave Joyce (14th District). He also managed about $1 million in finances and budgeting for various student groups and Greek organizations.

If elected, he said he’d like to provide more opportunities for farmers to learn about the system.

“I think someone coming in with a different perspective to help give a new mentality of service, of perspective from the outside — that can really turn what I think is a good office into an even better office,” he said.


Colonel Ty Seidule To Give Constitution Day Lecture September 17

“Professor Seidule is one of the leading historians of American Civil War and military history who has also written widely on the civil rights movement and cultural memory.”

COL-SEIDULE-Picture-400x600 Colonel Ty Seidule To Give Constitution Day Lecture September 17Col. Ty Seidule

Col. Ty Seidule ’84, professor and head of the history department at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, will deliver Washington and Lee University’s Constitution Day lecture. Seidule’s talk, titled “Robert E. Lee and Me: Reflections on Confederate Memory by a W&L Graduate, Soldier and Scholar,” will be held in Lee Chapel on Sept. 17 at 7:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Seidule received his B.A. from Washington and Lee and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Ohio State University. During his 30 years in the U.S. Army, Seidule has commanded cavalry and armor units in war and peace, serving in the United States, Germany, Italy, the Balkans, Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

A leader in digital history, Seidule is the creator and senior editor of the award-winning “The West Point History of Warfare,” an enhanced digital text published by Rowan Technology. He is also the creator and series editor of the “West Point Guide to the Civil Rights Movement” and the “West Point Guide to Gender and Warfare,” which is used by all cadets at the U.S. Military Academy.

Seidule also writes on West Point history, including Civil War memory and African American history, has chaired the Memorialization Committee at West Point, and is working on a history of the Black Power movement at West Point. As a public historian, he has created several open online courses.

“Professor Seidule is one of the leading historians of American Civil War and military history who has also written widely on the civil rights movement and cultural memory,” said Marc Conner, Washington and Lee’s provost. “As this year’s Constitution Day speaker, he brings significant academic expertise, as well as his perspective as a military officer.”

“Professor Seidule’s lecture will be the second major event in our yearlong Washington and Lee: Education and History series,” said Conner, “in which we are bringing a variety of speakers and scholars to campus to engage in issues of history, identity, self-representation and institutional understanding.

“This bold effort at interpreting not just our own cultural identity but that of the nation commenced with Danielle Allen’s Convocation address and our first-year reading program and continues with the Constitution Day lecture,” Conner added. “That Professor Seidule is also a W&L alumnus gives him a particularly compelling perspective on these matters. I’m extremely excited for his visit and eager to hear his ideas about these many complex issues.”

The talk is sponsored by the Mellon History in the Public Sphere project, the Office of the Provost and the History Department.

Seidule’s talk will be streamed live online at https://livestream.com/wlu/ty-seidule.

ty-seidule-1024x576 Colonel Ty Seidule To Give Constitution Day Lecture September 17Ty Seidule Livestream

VIDEO: Appalachian Adventure 2017 Appalachian Adventure, which takes students on a four-night hike of the Appalachian Trail, is the most popular pre-orientation trip at W&L.

Summer Experience: Stephen Kindermann ’18L Balances Work and Life in BigLaw

stephenkindermann-800x533 Summer Experience: Stephen Kindermann '18L Balances Work and Life in BigLawStephen Kindermann ’18L

Stephen Kindermann, a 3L from Rockville, Maryland, graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in Political Science and History. Stephen is a Senior Articles Editor for the German Law Journal and a Lead Articles Editor for the Washington and Lee Law Review. After his 1L year, Stephen served as a Judicial Intern to the Honorable Arenda L. Wright Allen in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  

What did you do for work this summer?

I worked as a summer associate with Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP in their New York City headquarters. I worked for eight weeks in the Corporate department, focusing on the capital markets, banking and finance, and private equity groups. I also worked for four weeks in the Business Finance and Restructuring department.

How did you find/get this position?

Dean Jarrett, OCS, and some of my professors encouraged me to apply to firms, including Weil, recruiting at the Northeast Washington and Lee Interview Program in Times Square. My screening interview with a partner in Weil’s capital markets group conveyed a clear passion about the work and the people at Weil. That evening, I received a call inviting me to a callback interview at Weil’s New York headquarters. I flew to New York to see the offices and met with associates, partners, and the recruiting team. Two days later, I received a phone call offering me a position in Weil’s 2017 Summer Associate Class.

Describe your work experience.

Weil’s NYC offices are located in Midtown at the General Motors Building in what I consider to be the most vibrant part of the city. The building sits at the start of Central Park and straddles Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue. Weil recently renovated its offices and the views of Central Park and the welcoming colleagues on every floor all reflect the familial culture at the firm. I met with a personal Assignment Coordinator who tailored my workflow to reflect my preferred practice areas and career goals. The work was always engaging and my supervisors from all seniority levels would always explain away any confusion. The Weil team goes out of its way to make sure each summer associate makes an informed decision about their future at the firm and their chosen practice area. We also had plenty of fun outside of the office too, with even more opportunities to get to know our fellow summer associates and future colleagues at the firm.

What classes were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

Given my interest in corporate law, I most drew on topics covered in Contracts, Close Business Arrangements, Securities Regulation, Publicly Held Businesses, and Secured Transactions.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

I had some reservations about the negative big firm stereotypes in New York City. But Weil sets itself apart from its peers. The firm encourages strong commitments to your work and your life outside of the office. I loved the high-level work and the collaborative environment. Weil hires the best attorneys that fit their culture and it shows. Seeing that firm culture in action every day and getting to know so many wonderful people were my favorite parts of the summer.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

After graduation in May, I will be returning to the New York City offices of Weil ,Gotshal & Manges as a Corporate Associate in the Capital Markets Group.

Related //

Analyzing Islamic State Messaging Zainab Abiza '19 spent the summer analyzing two Islamic State magazines in a timely project with Professor Seth Cantey.

“A challenging aspect of this project was learning about all the different ways in which the Islamic State is distorting my religion and using it to justify the atrocities they commit. Some of the texts I read were very disturbing.”

IMG_4760-800x533 Analyzing Islamic State MessagingZainab Abiza

Major: International Politics
Minor: Poverty Studies
Hometown: Rabat, Morocco

What was your summer research project?

Sam Childress and I worked with Professor Seth Cantey to determine where the Islamic State’s messaging is consistent and where it diverges across their magazines, Rumiyah and Saheefat al-Nabaa. We assume that the Arabic-language IS magazine Saheefat Al-Nabaa targets primarily Arab audiences while the English-language IS magazine Rumiyah targets those beyond the Arab world. Sam and I examined issues published over the past year and analyzed topics that appeared in both magazines or independently in one of them, depending on the target audience. We hope to eventually get our article published in a journal.

What did an average day for you look like?

I usually worked at the registrar’s office in the morning, then met up with Sam at the library in the afternoon to work on our research project. During this time, I was usually either reading articles from Saheefat al-Nabaa, discussing my findings with Sam or writing our article. Once a week, Sam and I met with Prof. Cantey to update him on our progress and get feedback. After work, I liked to go on a run or go to the gym, then go home, make dinner and watch Shark Tank with my housemates!

What was the most interesting thing you learned while working on this project?

The nature and the topic of our research project is unique and highly relevant to what is happening in the world today. Reading more than 40 issues of Saheefat al-Nabaa has definitely helped me gain a better understanding of the Islamic States’s motives and ideology. While working on this project, I was astonished by the way in which the Islamic State manages to skew the meaning of so many Qu’ran verses and sayings of the Prophet Muhammed by taking them out of context. Anyone who is not familiar with the Qu’ran and Islam might end up believing in their distorted evidence.

fbfbproff_jKRR6268-86-400x600 Analyzing Islamic State MessagingZainab Abiza

What was the biggest challenge you faced?

Reading in Arabic was definitely one of the most challenging aspects of my summer research project. Although I grew up learning both Moroccan and classical Arabic, I stopped taking classical Arabic classes in seventh grade and I have not been exposed to it much since then. At first, it was a little rough to read in classical Arabic, especially since all the texts had a lot of religious references. However, as soon as I started getting the hang of it again, it was not as difficult. Another challenging aspect of this project was learning about all the different ways in which the Islamic State is distorting my religion and using it to justify the atrocities they commit. Some of the texts I read were very disturbing.

Have you had any mentors during this time?

Prof. Cantey has been our mentor throughout this research project. Since freshman year, I’ve wanted to take one of his classes but I’ve never had a chance to do so (mostly because of the crazy wait lists). Working with him this summer has been a great honor and an invaluable experience. Prof. Cantey is an expert in the field of Middle East politics and terrorism studies. Our weekly meetings often turned into fascinating conversations about politics and current events. As cliché as this may sound, every time I leave his office I just feel like I know so much more than I did going in. Prof. Cantey has been very helpful with guiding us through this project and answering any questions we have, whether they are content-related or simply about an Arabic word I did not understand.

Did this experience impact your studies or future plans in any way?

This experience has further increased my interest in Middle East politics and the MENA region. This is a critical time for the Islamic State as they have just lost their largest city, Mosul, and they are slowly getting defeated by the Syrian forces in Raqqa, the capital of their self-proclaimed Caliphate. This research opportunity has enabled me to better understand the ideology of this group, as well as the implication of their actions as they are affecting people all over the world today.

I do not have any set post-graduation plans at the moment but I eventually would like to pursue a career in diplomacy with a focus on the MENA region. I look forward to taking Prof. Cantey’s terrorism and Middle East politics classes sometime over the next two years.

How did W&L prepare you for this experience?

This spring, I participated in the Washington Term Program and interned at the National Council on US-Arab Relations, a small political think tank in D.C. This opportunity allowed me to immerse myself in the politics of the MENA region and gain a deeper understanding of how U.S. foreign policy is affecting the Middle East. The timing of this internship couldn’t have been better. President Trump had just met with King Salman of Saudi Arabia during his first presidential trip abroad. Trump had also just approved a plan to arm the Syrian Kurdish Militia, the YPG, in hopes of pushing the Islamic State out of its de facto capital in the Syrian city of Raqqa. This internship was an invaluable experience which allowed me to dive into this research project more prepared.

Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?

This kind of summer experience enables students to immerse themselves in the project they are working on while also developing close relationships with the professor(s) they are working with. This is an opportunity for students to explore in-depth a specific topic or subject they are passionate about or interested in, without having to worry about any other work. It’s also been great to get to know and connect with a number of faculty members in Lexington this summer.

If you know a W&L student who would be a great profile subject, tell us about it! Nominate them for a web profile.

Remembering 9/11

soc091312_19-350x233 Remembering 9/11Flags on the Colonnade in honor of the lives lost on September 11, 2001.

The W&L community remembers today those whose lives were lost 16 years ago on September 11, 2001. Those losses include two members of the Washington and Lee family — Rob Schlegel, of the Class of 1985, who died in the Pentagon, and James Gadiel, of the Class of 2000, who died in the World Trade Center.

Rob was on the staff of the chief of naval operations at the Pentagon and had been promoted to commander just weeks prior to the attack. James worked in the equities department of Cantor Fitzgerald, on the 103rd floor of the north tower of the World Trade Center.


Center for International Education Presents Talk on Translating Aimé Césaire

“The conversation with Jim Arnold and Clayton Eshleman touches upon the linguistic and cultural barriers that exist in translation and adds another dimension to our conversation about borders.”

translating-aime-cesaire-600x400 Center for International Education Presents Talk on Translating Aimé CésaireTranslating Aim Césaire

Washington and Lee University’s Center for International Education presents Translating Aimé Césaire: A conversation with A. James Arnold and Clayton Eshleman. The talk is Sept. 19 at 5 p.m. in the Kenneth P. Ruscio Center for Global Learning. It is free and open to the public.

This talk will feature readings from Césaire in both French and English, followed by a conversation with the authors about the process of translating Césaire’s work. The conversation will be moderated by W&L’s James Leva, visiting assistant professor of French, who is currently teaching Césaire’s works in a course at W&L.

Césaire has been called the outstanding voice of the 21st century and is known as an imposing figure in the study of the African diaspora, Caribbean literature, and post colonialism.

“We are thrilled to kick off the second year of the Colloquium on Borders and their Human Impact,” said Mark Rush, Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Professor of Politics and Law. “The conversation with Jim Arnold and Clayton Eshleman touches upon the linguistic and cultural barriers that exist in translation and adds another dimension to our conversation about borders.”

James Arnold is the lead editor of Césaire’s complete works in French. The newly released book by Arnold and Eshleman is considered the definitive bilingual edition of Césaire’s poetry. Arnold is emeritus professor of French at the University of Virginia.

Clayton Eshleman is the author of over 100 books and is the major American translator of Césaire. Eshleman received the National Book Award for his translation of the poetry of César Vallejo. The Poetry Foundation describes Eshleman as “one of America’s foremost translators and poets.”

During his visit, Eshleman will also meet with the creative writing faculty at W&L and with Professor Seth Michelson’s class on Spanish-American poetry.

The event is sponsored by the 2016-18 Center for International Education Colloquium on Borders and Their Human Impact with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the University Library. The colloquium addresses the concept of borders and border crossings from a variety of perspectives that tie humanity to political, geophysical, physiological, epistemological and spiritual borders.

The talk will be streamed live online at https://livestream.com/wlu/aime-cesaire.

VIDEO: Sustainability Leadership Trip Students on the Sustainability Leadership pre-orientation trip had a chance to meet local food producers and learn about W&L's commitment to the environment.

Representatives from the European Organization for Nuclear Research to Visit W&L

“The Science without Borders program addresses the borders that exist among disciplines in the academy. The liberal model of education is grounded on the premise that knowledge transcends such disciplinary borders. This program manifests the spirit of liberal education and the excitement that occurs when we choose to transcend borders.”

cern-switzerland-header-1024x298 Representatives from the European Organization for Nuclear Research to Visit W&LCERN Switzerland

Washington and Lee University’s Center for International Education presents Science Without Borders at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The four-day event will feature a talk by CERN representatives Suyog Shrestha and Abha Eli Phoboo on Sept. 18 at 4:30 p.m. at the Science Addition A214 on W&L’s campus. The talk, which is free and open to the public, is part of the two-year Borders and Their Human Impact colloquium.

The duo will present an overview of the research project at CERN, the framework that allows scientists from across the world to collaborate and its global impact. In addition, Phoboo and Shrestha will give a physics seminar, lead a two-day workshop on “Why scientist need to write about science,” and conduct meetings with students and faculty.

“We are very excited that Suyog and Abha are coming to W&L,” said Irina Mazilu, professor of physics. “It is a great and rare opportunity for our students to learn about the research at CERN.”

“Our visitors from CERN come in conjunction with professor Mazilu’s new course on Applications of Physics to Social Sciences which, along with this part of the colloquium, embraces one of the nuanced aspects of the study of borders,” said Mark Rush, director of the center for international education.

“As we developed the colloquium, it was difficult not to think in terms of political borders and migration. While those topics are vitally important to the human condition around the world, the planning quickly expanded to include other borders with equally compelling impacts on humanity. The Science without Borders program with professors Shrestha and Phoboo addresses the borders that exist among disciplines in the academy. The liberal model of education is grounded on the premise that knowledge transcends such disciplinary borders. This program manifests the spirit of liberal education and the excitement that occurs when we choose to transcend borders.”

Suyog Shrestha is a physicist from the Ohio State University working on the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and most powerful particle accelerator. His research focuses on the measurement of the Higgs boson’s properties and explores the territory beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

Abha Eli Phoboo is a journalist who worked as a science writer at CERN. She has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Phoboo will conduct a two-day workshop on how to write about science for a large audience. Mazilu believes the the workshop will be useful for both science and non-science majors.

“The writing workshop will focus on why scientists need to write for non-expert audiences and how they can communicate their passion for the beauty that science allows them to see,” said Mazilu.

Equality and Difference Series Begins with Speaker Tariq Ramadan

Ramadan_Photo_2016_July-400x600 Equality and Difference Series Begins with Speaker Tariq RamadanTarik Ramadan

Tariq Ramadan, HH Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies at Oxford University, is the first speaker in the 2017-18 Equality and Difference series, sponsored by the Roger Mudd Center for Ethics at Washington and Lee University. This event will be held on Sept. 28 at 5:30 p.m. in Lee Chapel.

Ramadan will speak on “Equality as a Social Requirement and a Human Ideal.” It is free and open to the public.

Ramadan is a Swiss academic, philosopher and writer. He works primarily on Islamic theology and the status of Muslims in the West and within Muslim-majority countries. Through his writings and lectures Ramadan has contributed to the debate on the issues surrounding Islam.

Active in institutes of higher-ed around the world, Ramadan is senior research fellow at St Antony’s College at Oxford and Doshisha University in Japan. He is also a visiting professor at the Faculty of Islamic Studies in Qatar, director of the Research Centre of Islamic Legislation and Ethics, also in Qatar, president of the think tank European Muslim Network (EMN) in Brussels, and is a member of the International Union of Muslim Scholars.

The author of several books, Ramadan’s works include: “Islam: A Pelican Introduction” (2017), “The Arab Awakening: Islam and the New Middle East” (2012 and he is currently working on a book titled “Islamic Ethics: A Very Short introduction.”

He holds an M.A. in philosophy and French literature and a Ph.D. in Arabic and Islamic Studies from the University of Geneva.

Ramadan’s visit is co-sponsored by the W&L Center for International Education.

The Mudd Center was established in 2010 through a gift to the university from award-winning journalist Roger Mudd, a 1950 graduate of W&L. When he made his gift, Mudd said that “given the state of ethics in our current culture, this seems a fitting time to endow a center for the study of ethics, and my university is the fitting home.”

Ramadan’s talk will be streamed live online at https://livestream.com/wlu/tariq-ramadan.

For full details on this series, visit: https://www.wlu.edu/mudd-center.

Angela Smith, director of the Mudd Center, shares her thoughts on the Equality and Difference lecture series:

Upcoming Equality and Difference speaker dates and times are:

  • Tuesday, Oct. 3, 12 p.m.: Julie Woodzicka (Hillel Multipurpose Room)
  • Thursday, Oct. 26, 5 p.m.: T.M. Scanlon (Stackhouse Theater)
  • Wednesday, Nov. 8, 5 p.m..: Maggie Little (Hillel Multipurpose Room)
  • Thursday, Nov. 30, 5 p.m.: Laura I. Gomez (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, Jan. 25, 5 p.m.: Devon Carbado (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, Feb. 8, 5 p.m.: Suzan-Lori Parks (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Wednesday, Feb. 14, 5 p.m.: Katherine Boo (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, March 8, 5 p.m.: Miranda Fricker (Hillel Multipurpose Room)

W&L Law’s David Baluarte on Next Steps for DACA and the Dreamers Prof. David Baluarte, along with W&L law students, is working to help DACA beneficiaries and their families understand the immediate impact of the potential end of the program.

baluratelandscape-1024x714 W&L Law’s David Baluarte on Next Steps for DACA and the DreamersProf. David Baluarte, director of the W&L Immigrant Rights Clinic

Washington and Lee law professor David Baluarte, director of the school’s Immigrant Rights Clinic, will travel to Harrisonburg next week to meet with DACA beneficiaries to help them strategize in anticipation of the end of the program that will affect an estimated 800,000 people nationwide.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced this week the administration’s intention to end DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), which allows certain undocumented youth who were brought to the U.S. by their parents as children to receive a discretionary waiver of deportation and a work permit. President Trump has given Congress six months to act before the program terminates.

Baluarte, along with W&L students, is working with a partner organization, the New Bridges Immigrant Resource Center, to help DACA beneficiaries and their families understand the immediate impact of the administration’s decision. The information session will occur at Skyline Middle School in Harrisonburg on Friday, Sept. 15 at 6:00 pm.

Baluarte said the goal of the session is to make sure DACA beneficiaries, popularly known as Dreamers, and their families, understand the current situation and the way forward.

“We know that the work authorization for roughly 200,000 Dreamers will expire before March 5, 2018, the administration’s six-month deadline,” says Baluarte. “These people have until Oct. 5 to renew their DACA and receive an additional two-year work authorization.”

Baluarte is hopeful that for this community of Dreamers, the two-year window will give Congress enough time to implement a legislative solution that resolves their immigration status. Of greater concern is the 600,000 additional Dreamers who will begin to lose their deferred action status and work authorization after March 5 at an estimated rate of 1000 people per month.

“We really don’t know what’s going to happen for these people, but in the event that Congress fails to remedy their situation, they need to seek legal advice as soon as possible to see if they have some other path to legal immigration status.”

President Obama created DACA through executive order after legislation known as the Dream Act failed in Congress. Baluarte explained that President Obama used a combination of statutory and regulatory power that gives the executive branch the authority to defer at its discretion the enforcement of immigration laws against certain undocumented individuals and to issue them work permits. While Obama’s DACA order has been criticized as unconstitutional and an example of executive overreach, it has up until now survived all legal challenges in court.

Baluarte says that there is long-standing agreement across the political spectrum for the need to resolve the situation of undocumented minors, and personally, he does not find any of the reasons for ending DACA laid out by Attorney General Sessions convincing. However, he notes that there are already proposals in the U.S. House and Senate with support from both parties that will protect the Dreamers.

“If you look at the population of Dreamers, you find people who are motivated and hard-working, living the American Dream. We should view them as embodying the best of the spirit of our society, people who are taking us where we need to go, as opposed to the ethno-nationalist concept motivating the administration’s DACA decision. To me this seems totally un-American and does not reflect what our country is all about historically.”

W&L Joins Alliance Working to Expand Access for Talented Lower-Income Students American Talent Initiative brings together 69 of the nation’s most respected colleges and universities committed to attracting, enrolling and graduating more high-achieving, lower-income students.

ATI_Horiz_RGB W&L Joins Alliance Working to Expand Access for Talented Lower-Income Students

Washington and Lee University joined 68 of the nation’s top-performing colleges and universities in an alliance to substantially expand the number of talented low- and moderate-income students at America’s undergraduate institutions with the highest graduation rates. This growing alliance, called the American Talent Initiative (ATI) brings together a diverse set of public and private institutions united in a shared goal of educating 50,000 additional high-achieving, lower-income students across the country. Each ATI member institution will enhance its own efforts to recruit, enroll and support lower-income students, learn from each other and contribute to research that will help other colleges and universities effectively serve those students.

“Washington and Lee is proud to join the American Talent Initiative,” said William C. Dudley, Washington and Lee’s president. “By bringing national attention to this issue and enabling schools to share effective practices with each other, the initiative will help us to enroll and support a greater number of talented lower-income students at W&L. By doing so, W&L will make an important contribution to this critical national effort.”

Launched in December 2016, ATI is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Based on the most recent federal data available, there are approximately 430,000 lower-income students enrolled at 270 institutions with the highest graduation rates. ATI aims to increase and sustain the total number of lower-income students attending these top-performing colleges to about 480,000 by 2025. To reach this ambitious goal, ATI will work to support its members’ work while adding more top-performing colleges to its membership in the coming months and years.

Washington and Lee recognizes that America’s top-performing colleges have an important role to play in this effort. Research shows that when high-achieving, lower-income students attend high-performing institutions such as W&L, they graduate at higher rates and have a greater chance of attaining leadership positions and other opportunities throughout their lives. Yet in each graduating high school class, there are at least 12,500 lower-income young people with outstanding academic credentials who do not enroll at institutions where they have the greatest likelihood of graduating.

These students have earned the opportunity these institutions offer. ATI member institutions seek to ensure that these missing students have a path to attend and thrive at the institutions with the highest-graduation rates and best track records for post-graduate success. Each college and university participating in ATI will further the national goal of developing more talent through its own strategies, which include:

  • Recruiting students from diverse socio-economic backgrounds through robust outreach;
  • Ensuring that admitted lower-income students enroll and are retained through practices that have been shown to be effective;
  • Prioritizing need-based financial aid; and
  • Minimizing or eliminating gaps in progression and graduation rates between and among students from low-, moderate- and high-income families.

While many ATI member institutions have existing efforts to support lower-income students on their campuses, what sets Washington and Lee and other members’ ATI-related work apart is the commitment to working collectively toward a shared national goal and creating a community of practice, where members convene regularly to share insights and lessons learned. Member institutions of the American Talent Initiative are also committing substantial resources to increase opportunity for lower-income students, as well as collecting institutional data which will be annually published to assess their aggregate progress toward meeting the 50,000-by-2025 national goal.

Screen-Shot-2017-09-07-at-1.30.05-PM W&L Joins Alliance Working to Expand Access for Talented Lower-Income Students

Inauguration Kicks Off with Panel on “The Liberal Arts and the Professions”

Washington and Lee University will host a panel discussion on “The Liberal Arts and the Professions” as part of William C. Dudley’s inauguration as the university’s 27th president. The panel discussion will be held on Friday, Sept. 15 from 3:00 – 4:30 p.m. in Keller Theatre at the Lenfest Center for the Arts. A reception will follow. President Dudley’s inauguration ceremony will follow on Saturday, Sept. 16 at 10 a.m. on the Front Lawn.

The panel will be moderated by Suzanne Keen, dean of the College and Thomas H. Broadus Professor of English. Panelists include Kelly Evans Chemi ’07, representing journalism; William H. Miller III ’72 representing finance; Dr. Harold E. Varmus representing medicine; and the Hon. Gregory H. Woods representing law.

Chemi joined CNBC in 2012 and currently serves as co-anchor of “Closing Bell.” Prior to CNBC, she worked for The Wall Street Journal, penning the “Ahead of the Tape” column and covering the real estate and economics beat during the 2007-08 financial crisis. Evans was a George Washington Honor Scholar, co-captain of the lacrosse team, and inducted into national leadership society Omicron Delta Kappa. She was also raised in Lexington, and now resides in Manhattan.

Miller is the founder of Miller Value Partners. He also serves as chairman, chief investment officer and portfolio manager for Opportunity Equity and Income Opportunity Strategy. Previously, Miller and his partner, Ernie Kiehne, founded Legg Mason Capital Management and served as portfolio managers of the Legg Mason Capital Management Value Trust from its inception. Miller took over as sole manager in December 1990 and served in this role for the next 20 years. Prior to joining Legg Mason he served as treasurer of the J.E. Baker Co., a manufacturer of products for the steel and cement industries.

After graduation, he served as a military intelligence officer overseas and then pursued graduate studies in philosophy in the Ph.D. program at Johns Hopkins University. He received his CFA designation in 1986. Miller is chairman emeritus of the board of trustees of the Santa Fe Institute, where he served as chairman from 2005 to 2009.

Varmus, co-recipient of the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for studies of the genetic basis of cancer, joined the Meyer Cancer Center of Weill Cornell Medicine as the Lewis Thomas University Professor of Medicine in April 2015. He is also a senior associate member of the New York Genome Center, where he helps to develop programs in cancer genomics. Previously, Varmus was the director of the National Cancer Institute for five years, the president of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center for 10 years, and director of the National Institutes of Health for six years.

The author of scientific papers and five books, including a recent memoir titled “The Art and Politics of Science,” Varmus was a co-chair of President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, a co-founder and chairman of the board of the Public Library of Science, and chair of the scientific board of the Gates Foundation Grand Challenges in Global Health.

Woods is a graduate of Williams College and Yale Law School. At Yale, he was essays editor on the Yale Law Journal and received prizes for Best Brief and Best Oralist in the school’s moot court competition. He worked as a trial attorney in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1995 to 1998. From 1998 to 2009, he worked at the law firm of Debevoise & Plimpton in New York City, becoming partner in 2004. He served as deputy general counsel at the U.S. Department of Transportation from 2009 until 2012, when he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as general counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy. He held that position until his appointment to the bench.

On May 9, 2013, on the recommendation of U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer, President Barack Obama nominated Woods to serve as a U.S. District Judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Moderator Suzanne Keen joined the W&L faculty in 1995. She earned undergraduate degrees in English literature and creative writing from Brown University before going on to receive a master’s and a Ph.D. in English Language and Literature at Harvard University. Prior to joining W&L, she taught English at Yale University.

Keen’s administrative accomplishments at W&L include the formation of a Digital Humanities Initiative that involves librarians, faculty and IT professionals; a collaboration with the U.Va. Scholars’ Lab; and planning and initiatives for enhanced global learning. She has published six books and dozens of scholarly articles and has edited or co-edited numerous journals, including the Contemporary Women’s Writing. Among her many honors and awards is a Commonwealth of Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award from the State Council of Higher Education in Virginia.

Saturday’s inauguration ceremony will feature two introductory speakers, Gregory M. Avis and Steven G. Poskanzer. Avis is co-founder and senior advisor at the venture capital and private equity firm Summit Partners. Previously, he worked at McDonald & Co. and Goldman, Sachs & Co. He teaches mathematics at Eastside College Preparatory School in East Palo Alto, California and holds an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, and a B.A. in political economy from Williams College.

Poskanzer became Carleton College’s 11th president in 2010. A scholar of higher education law, he focuses his research on issues of academic freedom and how colleges and universities seek to achieve educational goals in a complex legal and policy environment. Before coming to Carleton, Poskanzer held senior administrative and academic positions at both private and public universities. Poskanzer received his undergraduate degree from Princeton University and a law degree from Harvard University. After practicing law briefly in Washington, D.C., he has spent his entire career in higher education.

For more information on the inauguration, visit https://www.wlu.edu/inauguration.

W&L Law Welcomes New Faculty Members

Washington and Lee is pleased to welcome three new faculty members this year.

haanweb W&L Law Welcomes New Faculty MembersSarah Haan

Sarah Haan joins W&L as a tenured member of the faculty.  Professor Haan writes about corporate political speech and disclosure.  She will teach Close Business Arrangements, Publicly Held Businesses and Professional Responsibility.

Prof. Haan received a B.A. in History from Yale University and a law degree from Columbia Law School, where she was an articles editor of the Columbia Law Review.  Prior to joining legal academia, Prof. Haan worked in the litigation department at Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York and as a Teach for America teacher in Compton, California.  Prof. Haan is admitted to the bar of New York State, to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, and to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

johnsonweb W&L Law Welcomes New Faculty MembersKristin Johnson

Kristin Johnson is visiting W&L for the fall semester as the Lewis Law Center Scholar in Residence. In addition to pursuing her research interests, Professor Johnson will teach Securities Regulation. She is visiting from her home institution of Seton Hall Law School.

Prof. Johnson specializes in the area of financial markets regulation. She has presented her research on systemic risk, risk management, cyber risk regulation and financial markets regulation throughout the United States and abroad. Her scholarship appears in nationally recognized law journals including the Washington and Lee Law Review, the University of Illinois Law Review, the University of Washington Law Review, the University of Colorado Law Review, Southern Methodist University Law Review and the University of Michigan Law Review.

Prior to entering the legal academy, Prof. Johnson served as Assistant General Counsel and Vice President at JP Morgan and practiced law as a corporate associate. During her tenure in private practice at Simpson, Thatcher and Bartlett LLP’s New York and London offices, she represented issuers and underwriters in domestic and international debt and equity offerings, lenders and borrowers in banking and credit matters, and private equity firms and publicly traded companies in mergers and acquisitions. Prior to law school, she was an analyst at Goldman Sachs & Co.

Professor Johnson received her B.A., cum laude, from Georgetown University, and her J.D., from the University of Michigan Law School, where she served as Notes Editor of the Michigan Law Review and received the Clara Belfield and Henry Bates International Research Fellowship.

stroudweb W&L Law Welcomes New Faculty MembersHernandez Stroud

Hernandez Stroud, a 2015 graduate of W&L Law, returns to Lexington for a one-year appointment as a Visiting Assistant Professor. He will teach a seminar on civil rights, an advanced legal writing seminar, and a practicum course on statutory interpretation.

After graduating from W&L, Prof. Stroud served as a fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and as acting director of development and policy for the City of New Haven. He then clerked for a U.S. District Judge in the Northern District of Alabama. Following his term as a VAP at W&L, Prof. Stroud will take a  clerkship position with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit.

Stroud received his B.A. from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and a M.Sc. in Education Policy for the University of Pennsylvania. Before attending law school, he taught history and government in Philadelphia for Teach for America.

Related //

Health Care Fieldwork in South Africa Through the U.Va. Field School for Public Health Research, Julie Sklar '18 was able to work with a medical anthropologist and epidemiologist in South Africa this summer.

“In Cape Town, I was able to better understand the complexity that underlies the blanket terms of ‘health’ and ‘wellness,’ as good health is multidimensional and is composed of biological, psychological, political, environmental, and social and cultural factors.”

sklar-800x533 Health Care Fieldwork in South AfricaJulie Sklar poses with a group of children in South Africa, where she conducted public health research during summer 2017.

Julie Sklar ’18
Hometown: Denver, Colorado
Major: Sociology
Minor: Poverty and Human Capability Studies

Q: Tell us a little bit about your summer opportunity.
I attended the University of Virginia Field School for Public Health Research in South Africa and worked with Dr. Christopher Colvin, a medical anthropologist and epidemiologist. The program provided an in-depth and mentored experience in public health research. While in South Africa, I was enrolled in two courses: one that focused on research methodology and the other a practicum in which I completed research in the field with five other students.

In South Africa, I conducted my fieldwork in Khayelitsha, which is the largest township in South Africa. Within Khayelitsha, I researched residents of Town Two (a specific area of Khayelitsha) who lived with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. As there are many organizations focusing on HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis in the area, my research group was interested in focusing on Type 2 diabetes and hypertension, diseases in that area that are not often discussed. The culmination of our research was a 45-minute presentation at the town hall, in which we invited all of our research participants, as well as community members, to attend.

My time in South Africa was made possible through funding from the Leyburn Scholars Fund and a Johnson Opportunity Grant.

Q: What has been your favorite aspect of your summer abroad?
Cape Town provides an incredible place to study and further my study of sociology and anthropology, as it is a city of ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic diversity. Cape Town tells a complex story between the rich and the poor, as some people in Cape Town suffer from malnutrition and the paralyzing epidemic of HIV, while others have access to state-of-the-art biomedicine. These discrepancies make Cape Town one of the most fascinating places in the world to study public health. Additionally, while I was stationed in Cape Town, I had the opportunity to travel to Zweletemba, a largely rural township that faces its own social and health challenges.

Q: What did an average day for you look like?
Every morning I traveled from Cape Town, where I was living, to the township of Khayelitsha, about a 30-minute bus ride. I began each morning with a Xhosa language class, which is an African click language that is spoken throughout the Western Cape. After class, most of the day was spent conducting research. That involved spending time in the local store trying to grasp prices of produce to interviewing a life-orientation teacher at the local secondary school to interviewing people living with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension about their lived experience with the disease and asking them to keep a photo diary of the food they ate.

Q: What has been the most rewarding and fulfilling part of your experience?
My favorite part of the program was my three-day homestay in the rural township of Zweletemba. During that time, I had no formal plans, which allowed me to truly immerse myself in my surroundings. My time in Zweletemba contrasted my time in Cape Town, a fast-paced, worldly city.

Q: What was the biggest challenge you faced?
The language component was undoubtedly the most challenging. The mother tongue of those living in Khayelitsha is Xhosa. And while some people spoke English, it was crucial to learn the basics of the Xhosa language to be able to communicate on a daily basis. The Xhosa language is an intricate African language that incorporates clicks on the letters x, c, and q. While I was only in South Africa for a short period, knowing the basics of the language proved essential, especially when asking people to open up about the most intimate and emotional details about living with a chronic illness.

Q: Who has served as a mentor to you this summer, and what have they taught you?
In Cape Town, I had the opportunity to work and study under Dr. Christopher Colvin, a medical anthropologist and epidemiologist whose research interests include HIV/AIDS, anti-retroviral treatment and masculinity; psychological trauma and storytelling; and community mobilization and health activism. During the research process, my group was assigned a field guide who was a respected member of the area, who helped introduce us to the local culture and research participants, as well assisting us with translation. Additionally, there were four research mentors each with graduate degrees in public health, who provided feedback throughout the research process.

Q: What have you learned at W&L that helped you in this endeavor, and what will you bring back to your life on campus?
Last semester, I had the opportunity to take Medical Anthropology with Professor Harvey Markowitz, a class that challenged me to think how we could integrate Western medicine into non-Western communities, saving lives while promoting and preserving cultural diversity. In Cape Town, I was able to better understand the complexity that underlies the blanket terms of “health” and “wellness,” as good health is multidimensional and is composed of biological, psychological, political, environmental, and social and cultural factors. While I have begun to learn how these factors intersect in a given society in my anthropology classes, having field experience monumentally deepened my understanding. Additionally, one of my favorite classes I have taken at W&L is Professor Novack’s Deviance course. In the field, I appreciated my background in this area, as certain medical diagnosis come with social stigma.

Q: Has this experience impacted your studies or future plans in any way?
This experience further cemented my interest in the field of public health. I plan to pursue a master’s in public health.

Q: Why is this kind of experience important to W&L students?
Washington and Lee has provided me a strong liberal arts background and has given me exposure to many different disciplines. However, having the opportunity to experience in real life the concepts and theories I have read and discussed in class has brought my understanding to the next level. My summer experience certainly demonstrated that the most rewarding moments come from venturing out of your comfort zone.

Q: Describe your summer adventure in one word:
Flexibility

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Summer Experience: Alumni Network Amplifies Opportunities for Alexis Narducci ’19L

narducci Summer Experience: Alumni Network Amplifies Opportunities for Alexis Narducci '19LAlexis Narducci ’19L

Originally from Jacksonville, Florida, Alexis Narducci received her undergraduate degree from Piedmont College, where she majored in political science and history and minored in criminal justice and English. She was also a member of the Piedmont College Women’s Lacrosse team for all four years. At W&L Law, she is the Co-President of the Pro Bono Club, Vice-President for the Sports, Entertainment and Intellectual Property  Law Society, and Director of Recruiting and Event Planning for Phi Alpha Delta.

What did you do for work this summer?

I interned with Judge Humphreys for the Virginia Court of Appeals during the first half of my 1L summer. For the second half of my 1L summer, I interned with the Atlanta Blaze Major League Lacrosse Team and the Bailey Lawyers. Throughout my whole summer, I also did research for McMenamin Law Offices.

How did you find this position?

I got my internship with the Court of Appeals of Virginia through the school’s OCI program. I got my internship with the Atlanta Blaze by reaching out to alumni, and one of them had a connection with the President of the Atlanta Blaze. The Bailey Lawyers sponsor the Atlanta Blaze, so one connection lead to another and I started interning for them part time as well. I got my research position for McMenamin Law Offices through a SCORE posting, and when I sent the firm my information, they actually knew Judge Humphreys for the Court of Appeals, so it all came full circle.

Describe your work experience.

With the Court of Appeals of Virginia, I did a lot of research and writing. For each case, I read both of the party’s briefs, did my own research, wrote a memo to the judge about what the law says about the issue presented, and then I would orally present my findings to the judge and we would discuss the case. This was very rewarding because I got to go to court and watch the attorneys argue each case that I wrote a memo on. For the Atlanta Blaze, I did more of their contract work. I worked on contracts with players, venue leases, and corporate sponsorships, as well as creating waivers for clinics and tournaments and looking over ticket language. This internship gave me a first-hand experience of all of the facets of a professional sports organization. With The Bailey Lawyers and McMenanim Law Offices, I primarily did research and wrote memos. Also with The Bailey Lawyers, I had the opportunity to interact with clients and see how a case operates from start to finish. The Bailey Lawyers focus on personal injury, while McMenamin Law Offices focuses on healthcare.

What were some skills you developed this summer?

I developed better research and writing skills this summer because I was doing research and writing on a wide variety of subjects. I also learned better time-management skills because while most people balance one of two internships, I was trying to balance four.

What classes or experiences were useful in preparing you for the summer work?

Administrative law was useful for preparing me this summer because the first case I did at the Court of Appeals was an immigration case that dealt with administrative law. Also, contracts helped me a lot because I understood the contract language when I looked over all of the Blaze’s contracts. Finally, torts helped prepare me to work with The Bailey Lawyers because they specialize in personal injury.

What surprised you about the work you did this summer?

I was surprised at how hard research can actually be. One of the biggest struggles for me this summer was knowing when to stop researching and start writing. Also, I was surprised at how much I learned during my 1L year. I think during 1L year it is easy to feel lost and like you don’t know what you’re doing, but I understood everything that was thrown at me during my internships, or I at least knew enough to ask more specific questions about the matters.

What was your favorite aspect of this summer work experience?

My favorite aspect of this summer was all of the different things I got to do. All of my internships were different in one way or another, so I never got bored of the work I was doing and it kept me on my toes.

Has this experience helped you figure out post graduate plans, and if so, how?

I am still up in the air about what I want to do after graduation because I liked each of my internships. That makes it harder to narrow down exactly what I want to do.

How do you think this experience will shape the rest of your time at W&L Law?

I think I know how to study better for exams now because I have seen how issues relate to cases in the real world. I also think I realized that I need to network more while at W&L because our alumni network is huge and very helpful.

Related //

Staniar Gallery Presents “Bittersweet on Bostwick Lane”

Weaving the innocence of childhood with the gravity that attends the passage of time, Worsham’s work reflects on love, loss, death, and discovery.

Screen-Shot-2017-09-04-at-11.47.34-AM-600x400 Staniar Gallery Presents "Bittersweet on Bostwick Lane"Persimmon Grave

Washington and Lee University’s Staniar Gallery is pleased to present “Bittersweet on Bostwick Lane,” an exhibit by Richmond-based photographer Susan Worsham.

The show will be on view Sept. 1-29, with a public artist’s talk and reception on September 20 at 5:30 p.m. in Wilson Hall’s Concert Hall. Both the exhibit and the talk are free and open to the public.

In this series, Susan Worsham photographs the street where she grew up and her elderly neighbor Margaret, one of the last connections to her youth. Weaving the innocence of childhood with the gravity that attends the passage of time, Worsham’s work reflects on love, loss, death, and discovery.

Worsham has been artist-in- residence at Light Work in Syracuse, New York and a nominee of the Santa Fe Prize for Photography. Her work is held in private collections and has been exhibited at Light Work, Danville Museum of Fine Arts, Corcoran Gallery of Art during FotoWeek DC, Photographic Center Northwest, and Dean Jensen Gallery.

In 2012, Worsham received the Theresa Pollak Prize for Photography and was named one of Oxford American’s “New Superstars of Southern Art.”

Staniar Gallery is located on the second floor of Wilson Hall, in Washington and Lee University’s Lenfest Center for the Arts. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please call 540-458-8861.

Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and LGBTQ Resource Center Host BBQ

WGSS-bbq-poster-226x350 Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies and LGBTQ Resource Center Host BBQFall BBQ

The W&L Community is invited to a barbecue on Friday, Sept. 8, from 5:30pm to 7:30pm outside the Red House, next door to Red Square parking lot and Hillel.

There will be live music, food and a welcoming environment for all members of the campus community.

Sponsored by the Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program and the LGBTQ Resource Center.


W&L Classics Professor Awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Grant

“Our Digital Humanities Initiative has sought to bring undergraduates into our DH projects for their benefit, and we are proud that students will continue to contribute to the digital edition.”

rebecca_benefiel_spot W&L Classics Professor Awarded National Endowment for the Humanities GrantRebecca Benefiel

Washington and Lee University’s Rebecca Benefiel, associate professor of classics, working with her colleague in computer science Sara Sprenkle, received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to support digitization of Pompeian epigraphy as part of the Ancient Graffiti Project.

Although the range of Benefiel’s expertise includes such varied topics as Roman law, early Christianity, and ancient advertising, she has become internationally known for her work on ancient wall inscriptions, also called graffiti.

In particular, her examination of the graffiti of Pompeii has resulted not only in her own numerous scholarly articles but also in popular articles about her work in such varied publications as USA Today, Science News, and Smithsonian magazine.

“Though the digital accessibility of nuanced information about the inscriptions is an important goal of the project, from my perspective as Dean of the College the impact on undergraduate collaborators is especially praiseworthy,” said Suzanne Keen, dean of the college. “Our Digital Humanities Initiative has sought to bring undergraduates into our DH projects for their benefit, and we are proud that students will continue to contribute to the digital edition.”

Benefiel joined the Washington and Lee faculty in 2005 after receiving her Ph.D. in classical philology from Harvard. She received her B.A. in classics from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and conducted additional post-graduate study in Rome.

W&L Receives Grant to Install New Sub-Meters in Upper-Division Housing

“We hear from students over and over that they want to save energy…They are eager for tools to help them manage their spaces responsibly, and these sub-meters will provide exactly that.”

krr0081_720 W&L Receives Grant to Install New Sub-Meters in Upper-Division HousingThe Village

Washington and Lee University has received a $21,800 grant from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund to help fund a new sub-metering project in the upper-division housing known as the Village.

In one year, the goal is to install sub-meters in 17 student residence buildings and to connect them and other existing campus sub-meters to a web-based management platform known as Lucid. The grant will fund the purchase of new sub-meter hardware for the Village, including replacement, repair and calibration of all the sub-meters currently on campus.

The project will allow students living in the townhouses and apartments to see their electricity use in real time, track it over specific periods, and compare it to that of their neighbors, through an interface they can access on their cellphones.

The new meters, along with the Lucid software, will allow for significantly improved outreach and education, particularly to students, according to W&L’s energy specialist Jane Stewart.

“This is something many students have been asking for, and an idea that got great support in a recent student survey,” Stewart said. “Many faculty members have also been eager to see sub-meters in the Village as part of our broader environmental efforts.”

Stewart believes the sub-metering project not only gives individuals responsibility for the campus carbon reductions, but can also instill crucial habits that students, faculty and staff will share with others.

“We hear from students over and over that they want to save energy, and many of them are actively trying to understand how saving energy will also help them save on their bills when they move off campus,” Stewart said. “They are eager for tools to help them manage their spaces responsibly, and these sub-meters will provide exactly that.”

The sub-meters will be installed this fall, and W&L plans to work into the winter to have them fully functioning. While exact calculations are not possible prior to installation, a 12 percent overall campus reduction in the use of electricity and natural gas from the fiscal year 2017 baseline data is predicted, thanks to the added sub-meters.


VIDEO: Welcome Class of 2021! Over two weekends, our communications team talked with 86 of our incoming first-years, learning a bit about where they're from and why they chose to join the W&L community.


Eric Klinenberg Opens W&L’s Questioning Intimacy Series

“Almost anyone, at any age and from any walk of life, is curious about intimacy in some form or other. This is relevant to all of us.”

Eric-Klinenberg_photo-400x600 Eric Klinenberg Opens W&L's Questioning Intimacy SeriesEric Klinenberg

The first visiting speaker in Washington and Lee University’s yearlong “Questioning Intimacy” interdisciplinary seminar series is  lecturer and social scientist Eric Klinenberg. His talk will be Thursday, Sept. 14 at 4:30 p.m. in Stackhouse Theatre, Elrod Commons.

The title of the lecture, which is open to the public, is “The Sociology of Connection: From Going Solo to Modern Romance.”

Klinenberg is a Professor of sociology, public policy, and media, culture and communications at New York University. Known as a lively speaker, Klinenberg has appeared on the Bill Maher show and NPR’s “This American Life” and has written for Rolling Stone.

His speech will cover two of his most notable works, which includes, “Going Solo” (2013) and his book “Modern Romance” (2016), a New York Times bestselling collaboration with comedian Aziz Ansari.

Questioning Intimacy is a yearlong seminar series that strives to explore intimacy in its various forms. The seminar is organized around a series of six visiting speakers chosen for the discipline they represent and the perspective they bring to W&L’s study of intimacy. Each of the speakers is a leader in his or her field. Four W&L faculty members teamed up to plan the series.

“I think the great thing about this series is that it is engaging at a gut level, and can be interesting for all disciplines,” said Karla Murdock, professor of psychology. “Almost anyone, at any age and from any walk of life, is curious about intimacy in some form or other. This is relevant to all of us.”

The three public lectures in the fall provide occasion for reflection on the meaning, experience, future and value of intimate life. In addition to Klinenberg, speakers include poet and literary critic Susan Stewart and evolutionary psychologist Zanna Clay. Three public lectures in the winter/spring will explore these themes in applied or practical settings. These speakers include urbanist Charles Montgomery, legal scholar Anita Allen, and pediatric oncologist and divinity school professor Raymond Barfield.

In addition to attending public talks by each speaker, W&L students, faculty and staff may register to join a core group of committed seminar participants. Seminar participants will meet throughout the year to attend luncheon discussions with the speakers, with student participants assuming leadership roles. Seminar participants will also participate in additional meetings to discuss the issues raised by the speakers and the topics they address.

The Questioning Intimacy series speaker dates and times are as follows:

  • Thursday, Sept. 14, 4:30 p.m.: Eric Klinenberg (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)
  • Thursday, Sept. 28, 4 p.m.: Susan Stewart — public lecture (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)
  • Thursday, Nov. 2, 4:30 p.m.: Zanna Clay (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)
  • Thursday, Jan. 11, 4:30 p.m.: Charles Montgomery (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)
  • Thursday, Feb. 1, 4:30 p.m.: Anita Allen (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)
  • Thursday, Mar. 1, 4:30 p.m.: Raymond Barfield (Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons)

Interested participants can apply here.

W&L’s Mudd Center for Ethics to Host Equality and Difference Lecture Series

“We really wanted to do a series that would allow us to approach some questions about the meaning and value of equality.”

Washington and Lee University’s Mudd Center for Ethics begins its 2017-18 lecture series: Equality and Difference on Sept. 28 at 5:30 p.m. in Lee Chapel. The first lecturer is Tariq Ramadan, HH Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani professor of contemporary Islamic studies at Oxford University. Ramadan’s talk is titled: “Equality as a Social Requirement and Human Ideal.” The series is free and open to the public.

The Mudd Center was established in 2010 through a gift to the University from award-winning journalist Roger Mudd, a 1950 graduate of W&L. By facilitating collaboration across traditional institutional boundaries, the center aims to encourage a multidisciplinary perspective on ethics informed by both theory and practice.

This is the fourth series of its kind facilitated by the Mudd Center. Previous years’ themes have included Markets and Morals (2016-17), The Ethics of Citizenship (2015-16), and Race and Justice in America (2014-15).

The yearlong series will feature nine speakers from across disciplines and career fields to cover a range of equality issues. Topics include group-based disparagement humor, moral values surrounding pregnant women, and immigration.

“We really wanted to do a series that would allow us to approach some questions about the meaning and value of equality,” said Angela Smith, director of the Mudd Center. “What does it mean to treat each other as equals in moral or political or social life?”

The series also reaches across W&L curricula, and Smith believes the recent events in Charlottesville make discussions around equality even more pertinent.

Click to hear Smith share her thoughts on the Equality and Difference lecture series:

Equality and Difference speaker dates and times are:

  • Thursday, Sept. 28, 5:30 p.m.: Tariq Ramadan (Lee Chapel)
  • Tuesday, Oct. 3, 12 p.m.: Julie Woodzicka (Hillel Multipurpose Room)
  • Thursday, Oct. 26, 5 p.m.: T.M. Scanlon (Stackhouse Theater)
  • Wednesday, Nov. 8, 5 p.m..: Maggie Little (Hillel Multipurpose Room)
  • Thursday, Nov. 30, 5 p.m.: Laura I. Gomez (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, Jan. 25, 5 p.m.: Devon Carbado (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, Feb. 8, 5 p.m.: Suzan-Lori Parks (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Wednesday, Feb. 14, 5 p.m.: Katherine Boo (Stackhouse Theatre)
  • Thursday, March 8, 5 p.m.: Miranda Fricker (Hillel Multipurpose Room)

‘The Perspective of a Real Journalist’ Matt Kaminer '18 stepped outside his comfort zone to work on some big stories during an internship with the Charlotte Observer.

“Our professors prepare students not only to produce high-quality content, but also to transition seamlessly into a professional setting.”

matt-at-work-800x533 'The Perspective of a Real Journalist'Matt Kaminer ’18 on the job as a summer intern at the Charlotte Observer.

Major: Business Journalism
Hometown: Hewlett, New York

Where did you intern this summer?

The Charlotte Observer, in Charlotte, North Carolina. I was fortunate enough to receive a Reynolds Scholarship for Business Journalism from our department, which made the decision to work far from home possible.

Tell us a little bit about that organization.

The Observer has a great tradition in Charlotte as a go-to source, both for timely breaking news and quality long-form stories. There are 50 or so employees. The internship program was very well organized and structured for the interns to get as much out of the summer as possible. Once a week, the 10 interns would meet with a crew of editors to highlight some of the best work from the interns in that week.

Describe your job there.

I worked as a Business News intern, but I also got to cover some local/metro news and even a few sports stories. The business staff is small so I was able to involve myself in the regular workflow of the business desk and develop relationships with my co-workers. One thing I learned this summer was that business can take on many different meanings; I covered stories about banks cutting work-from-home jobs, economic growth in Charlotte,  and protests of local government and real estate development. I also got to take on some enterprise pieces, such as a profile of a high school graduate who is the youngest of 13 siblings. I found myself frequently chatting with economists and financial analysts at the top of their fields. The Observer brand empowered me to open doors with sources with whom I might not normally have had the opportunity to talk.

What was the best story or project you worked on?

The best project I worked on was one that I couldn’t even really put my name on. In my first week in Charlotte, a co-worker was working on a story looking into government records of pool inspections and asked for my help. She was suspicious that the local health department was giving permits to pools that, in reality, had serious safety issues, including loose electrical wires and contaminated water.

We spent hours sifting through the online inspection database, comparing current pool permits to the list of pools that were denied a permit last summer. I made calls to hotels and apartment buildings to elaborate on the information found online, then crunched numbers on which pools could be unsafe to use. We ultimately published a story right around Memorial Day weekend, just before pool season began. Weeks later (after the Observer published other stories about the health department), the health director resigned.

Although I can’t take credit for the outstanding work my co-workers did, it was nice to be a part of a project that had tangible real-life significance. It didn’t matter whose name got put on the story, as long as we got the job done. In my opinion, we did.

Who did you meet, such as a source, a story subject or a mentor, that made the most vivid impression on you – and why?

Before arriving in Charlotte, I made it a goal of mine to connect with my co-workers not just as reporters, but also as mentors to whom I could go for advice. Early on in my internship, Fred Kelly, a reporter on the Observer’s investigations desk, introduced himself to the interns and made it known that he’d be happy to answer any questions, help with a story or just grab lunch sometime. Fred would always come around the intern section of the office just to chat, and quickly we noticed that we were both into basketball. Before long, Fred and I began taking our lunch break to go to the local YMCA and play basketball twice a week, as long as we weren’t on deadline. Having co-workers that cared not only about my work product but also about my summer experience really made my time at the Observer enjoyable.

When did you feel the most challenged and how did you meet that challenge?

On my second day in Charlotte, my editor sent me out to a low-income housing development a few minutes from the newsroom called Brookhill Village. We had heard that the village’s owner was going to knock down some of the homes, so my goal was to learn more about the dilapidated conditions of the village and find out what people were going to do if their homes got destroyed. However, we had no concrete sources, so my job was to basically walk around the village, go up to residents and ask them about their lives.

Before coming to the Observer, I deeply feared these “man-on-the-street” assignments. But before I left the office for Brookhill, one of my co-workers sat me down and told me to treat these opportunities like lifting weights: they’re not always fun, but you can only get better at them by continuing to try them. Once I got to the village, I dropped any insecurity I might have had before, and I knocked on dozens of homes, hearing tragic story after tragic story from these hard-working people. The Brookhill Village piece taught me how to report outside of my comfort zone; it wasn’t easy, but I definitely improved as a journalist that day.

Did anything about the location of your internship really excite you, such as the food, architecture, outdoors, etc.?

I really enjoyed working right in the middle of Uptown Charlotte. My desk gave me a clear view of Bank of America Stadium (where the Carolina Panthers play) and the Observer newsroom is in the same building as the NASCAR Hall of Fame. Nicknamed “Banktown,” Charlotte is home to the Bank of America headquarters as well as Wells Fargo’s largest employee base. Seeing those offices as I walk through the city each day was a pleasant reminder that the topics I covered as a business reporter are ingrained in the city’s culture.

Will this internship impact the direction of your career in any way?

My current plans are to attend law school and hopefully work in a legal capacity for newspapers or other media organizations, working to protect the rights of journalists to report on the observations they make every day. Interning at the Observer gave me the perspective of a real journalist that I hope to maintain as an attorney. During my internship, the Observer also had its media attorney give a guest lecture to the interns. He explained to us how he has switched back and forth between the newsroom and the courtroom throughout his career, and hearing that really confirmed for me that the skills I sharpened this summer will serve me well in the future.

How did W&L help to prepare you for this opportunity?

Our professors prepare students not only to produce high-quality content, but also to transition seamlessly into a professional setting. Taking Beat Reporting last fall gave me experience in working with an editor, pitching stories, interviewing sources and asking “the extra question,” skills that I called upon daily as an Observer intern. Professor Swasy’s Reporting on the Economy class, which I took last winter, helped mold my skills for a business environment, teaching me how to take a commerce-oriented angle on even the most routine story.

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