The Columns

W&L Alums Missal and Sharman Discuss Public Corruption and Special Investigations Both speakers have extensive experience as special investigators in high profile investigations involving both public and private sector work.

— by on October 2nd, 2017

“Investigations into government officials, corporate executives, and not-for-profit agencies are the sort that Jack and Mike conduct, and are designed to shed light on alleged corruption and illegal behavior.”

Mike Missal ’78 and Jack Sharman ’83

Washington and Lee University’s Williams School of Commerce, Economics and Politics presents “Send Lawyers, Guns and Money: Public Corruption and Special Investigations” featuring speakers Michael J. Missal ’78 and Jack Sharman ’83. The talk, which is free and open to the public, is Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. in the Millhiser Moot Courtroom, Sydney Lewis Hall.

Both speakers have extensive experience as special investigators in high profile investigations involving both public and private sector work.

“One can’t read the news on a given day without coming across a range of stories involving such investigations,” said Robert D. Straughan, Crawford Family Dean of the Williams School and professor of business administration. “Investigations into government officials, corporate executives, and not-for-profit agencies are the sort that Jack and Mike conduct, and are designed to shed light on alleged corruption and illegal behavior.”

Missal is inspector general of the Department of Veterans Affairs, where he directs a nationwide staff of auditors, investigators, inspectors and support personnel. His office conducts oversight review to improve the economy, effectiveness and efficiency of Veterans Affairs programs, and to prevent and detect criminal activity, waste, abuse and fraud.

Sharman is a partner at Lightfoot, Franklin & White, LLC in Birmingham, Alabama. He has an active white-collar criminal defense, internal-investigations and corporate compliance practice. Additionally, Sharman blogs as White Collar Wire and publishes a Twitter feed @WhiteCollarWire devoted to news, commentary and cases involving white-collar criminal and government-enforcement matters.

“Law Dean Brant Hellwig and I quickly concluded that this program would be of interest to both undergraduate and law students,” said Straughan. “Mike and Jack, who have both supported the university in a variety of roles, were quick to agree to join us for the program.”

The talk is co-sponsored by the School of Law and the Williams School.