The Columns

Anthropology Professor at Notre Dame Will Discuss International Migration across the Mediterranean Sea

— by on January 18th, 2017

Maurizio Albahari (Photo by Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)

Maurizio Albahari, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, will give a public talk at Washington and Lee University on Feb. 1 at 5 p.m. in Stackhouse Theater, Elrod Commons.

He will speak on “Crimes of Peace: Methods and Ethics of European Responses to Mediterranean Migrations.” The talk is free and open to the public.

This event is part of the Center for Global Learning’s Borders and Their Human Impact series, sponsored jointly by the Italian Studies Faculty Cohort.

Borders and Their Human Impact is a two-year faculty colloquium sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The colloquium addresses the concept of borders and border crossings from a variety of perspectives that tie humanity to political, geophysical, physiological, epistemological and spiritual borders.

“In my talk, I will discuss international migration across the Mediterranean Sea, and tackle the latest developments in this crisis of humanity,” said Albahari. “An analysis of the practices put forward by institutional and coastal European actors sheds light on how this crisis is being perpetuated or mitigated,” he continued.

Albarari is the author of “Crimes of Peace: Mediterranean Migrations at the World’s Deadliest Border” (2015). He says, “‘Crimes of Peace’ scrutinizes global fault lines critically reemerging in the Mediterranean: between Europe, Africa and the Middle East; military and humanitarian intervention; Catholic charity, hospitality and police detention; transnational smuggling and resilient sovereignty; the universal law of the sea and the proliferating thresholds of a globally parochial world.”

Albahari is also a concurrent associate professor with the Keough School of Global Affairs at Notre Dame and a faculty fellow with Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies.